PART ONE

(Noise inside TARDIS of alarm. HEX is a young male with Scouse accent who first appeared in the Big Finish story The Harvest.)
HEX: Ace! What the 'ell's going on?
ACE: What makes you think I have any idea?
HEX: One minute I'm getting me head down for a kip, the next all the lights have gone out and the whole place is lurching like a bucking bronco, making a noise like a steam engine giving birth.
ACE: You're welcome to look at the controls. See if you can make any sense of them.
HEX: Well ... those are the warning lights, right? Only, I've never seen them all lit up at once before.
(Deep bell gong - the Cloister Bell.)
HEX: What's that? Doesn't sound good.
ACE: It's not. It means the TARDIS is in serious trouble...
(Calling out loudly)
ACE: ... and that the pilot should get to the control room A.S.A.P.!
HEX: The Doctor? Yeah, wh-where is he?
ACE: I don't know. But if he's not answering the Cloister Bell, that can only mean one thing. The Doctor is not in the TARDIS.

(Opening Doctor Who theme music composed by Keff McCulloch, with no announcer.)

(Cloister Bell gong.)
HEX: Well, he's not in his room, or the games room, or the gym, or the sauna, or the lib...
ACE: He's not on board, Hex. Internal scan registers only two life-forms in the TARDIS - you and me.
HEX: So the Doctor's done a bunk?
ACE: He wouldn't leave us, not unless he was forced to.
HEX: You mean he's been kidnapped? Great. The Doc's been kidnapped.
ACE: Well, that explains the Cloister Bell. It's the TARDIS's way of letting us know he's been abducted.
HEX: Well, it doesn't explain why everything else has gone haywire, though.
ACE: Hex, panicking isn't going to help the situation.
HEX: No? Well I'm sorry, Ace, but I can't think of anything better to do under the circumstances.
ACE: It the Doctor's not on board, then it's up to us to try to sort things out.
HEX: And how do you suggest we do that? Play a game of TARDIS console lucky dip until something happens? You press all the red buttons and I'll press all the green ones.
ACE: These are the controls that deal with materialisation. If I can land the TARDIS, we might be able to get help.
HEX: Yeah. Good luck with that. Landing us somewhere with a TARDIS repair service.
ACE: Well, do you have any better ideas?
HEX: No. Like I said, panicking was my best one.
ACE: Well, I'm going to try and materialise. Are you going to try and stop me?
HEX: No. No, you go for it, doll.
ACE: Watch it, moosh. (Sigh.) All right, here goes.
(Console switches pressed.)
HEX: D-doesn't the Doctor normally press that switch first?
ACE: Hex! He presses that switch last.
HEX: No. That's for takeoffs. He presses it first for landings.
ACE: Look, if this doesn't work, you can have a go, but until then, let me get on with it. These buttons here, then that switch there...
(Sudden movement.)
ACE: Whoah!
(Soaring sound.)

(Classical music: Carmen - Bizet, ALBERT humming "bom, bom" to the sound. ALBERT and PEGGY have a Yorkshire accent.)
PEGGY: Albert? Cup of tea?
ALBERT: Oh. Thanks, love.
PEGGY: How's my brave soldier? Oh, you've dug quite a trench there.
ALBERT: I've been at it half a morning. Oh, that hits the spot.
PEGGY: You just be careful. I don't want you tramping mud all over the carpet.
ALBERT: Don't worry. I'll put some newspaper down first.
PEGGY: When you've done that you can do the windows.
ALBERT: Blinking heck, Peg. You're a right slave-driver today.
PEGGY: I know you, Albert Marsden. Given half a chance you'd be in that potting-shed of yours with your feet up snoring to the high heavens. You finished with that cup?
ALBERT: Give me a chance.
(Cup moved.)
ALBERT: All done.
(Soaring overhead.)
PEGGY: That's the eighth one today.
ALBERT: Cup of tea?
PEGGY: No. Aircraft.
ALBERT: Wonder where they're going. Haven't seen any coming back.
PEGGY: Hope they don't. I could do with a bit of peace and quiet.
ALBERT: But what about me? Out here in the freezing cold. Took me years to get that lawn looking nice, now look at it.
PEGGY: Well, you can just stay away from my herbaceous borders. I tried calling Raymond again.
ALBERT: No answer?
PEGGY: I was hoping to get through to that answering machine of his but it just keeps going bleep-bleep at me.
ALBERT: They did say there might be some trouble with the lines. They want them clear for emergencies.
PEGGY: Isn't me worrying about my son- and daughter-in-law an emergency?
ALBERT: No, love. You know it's not. Come here.
PEGGY: Oh no. Don't you try hugging me, not with those dirty hands.
ALBERT: They'll be all right. Our Raymond's got a good head on his shoulders.
PEGGY: You don't think he's already left, to join us up here?
ALBERT: Not without phoning first.
PEGGY: But he might not have been able to phone first.
ALBERT: Well, he'll come when he ... when he comes.
PEGGY: But what if he never comes?
ALBERT: He said he'd come. He promised us.
PEGGY: Only, it's been so long. He should have been here by now.
ALBERT: Then we'll just have to keep on waiting, won't we?
PEGGY: I don't think he's ever coming.
ALBERT: Don't give up. We can't give up.
PEGGY: Then what else can we do?
ALBERT: We just have to keep on hoping, that's all.
(Faint sound of TARDIS materialisation.)
PEGGY: What's that?
ALBERT: Wait there. I'll go and look.

(Materialisation.)
HEX: Oh! We made it.
ACE: If you're going to make a crack about women drivers, I should warn you, I've got a baseball bat in my room.
HEX: I wasn't going to say a word. Though I've learned one thing today.
ACE: What's that?
HEX: That the TARDIS has a spin cycle.
ACE: Ha-ha, very funny.
(Whirring sound from console instrument.)
HEX: Well, we're on Earth. That's something to be grateful for.
ACE: Come on, let's get some fresh air.
HEX: We could always stay put. That Cloister Gong's shut up.
ACE: Bell.
(Door opened.)
ACE: You can stay here if you like. I'm going outside.

(Bird song.)
ACE: Oh! It's a bit chilly. You might want to get your coat.
HEX: No, it's all right. I'll live. Once you've felt the Antarctic wind in your keks, you kind of get a different perspective on the whole cold thing.
ACE: Suit yourself.
(Door closed over.)
ACE: We'll try that cottage. It can't be more than half a mile.
HEX: Someone likes to get away from it all. Still, looks Twentieth Century. Telephone wires, but - no satellite dish.
ACE: Yeah. And I'm guessing this is the guy who lives there.
ALBERT: Hello? Can I help you?
(Walking over.)
HEX: Yeah. Er, maybe you can. We're a bit ... lost.
ALBERT: Lost?
ACE: Yeah, we've kind of gone on holiday by accident.
ALBERT: But you don't have backpacks. What about your tents?
ACE: Er, Hexy was being chased by a bull and threw our stuff at it to distract it.
HEX: Hey. I wasn't the one who was screaming.
ACE: I think you'll find it was you who was doing the screaming, like a little girl.
ALBERT: But you don't have hiking boots. If you don't mind me saying, you don't seem to have come out very prepared.
HEX: Yeah. Next year we're doing Skeggie, definite.
ACE: You wouldn't be able to point us in the direction of the nearest town, would you?
ALBERT: You're a bit out of luck, I'm afraid. Nearest is Hebden Bridge, that's eight miles. If you don't mind me asking, what were you doing inside that thing?
ACE: What thing?
ALBERT: The Police Box. I saw you getting out. Haven't seen one of these for years. Though shouldn't it be blue? I don't remember ever seeing a white one before.
HEX: Ace, I think it's time we told this good gentleman the truth.
ACE: The truth?
HEX: The thing is, I'm due to get married tomorrow, and last night was me stag do. And me hilarious mates - well, as a joke, they must have waited until I was out cold, and then locked me up in that Police Box, because the next thing I know, I'm waking up inside it with this young lady here.
ACE: Hex...
ALBERT: In my day we just spent the evening playing dominoes.
HEX: Yeah. I'm kind of wishing that's what we'd done too.
ALBERT: So this young lady here, she would be, erm...?
ACE: The innocent victim of a cruel prank. So, if you could see your way clear to giving us a life, we'd be dead grateful.
ALBERT: Well, I don't know about a lift, but you're welcome to use the telephone.
HEX: Oh, thanks. That'd be a great help.
ALBERT: I'm Albert, by the way. Albert Marsden. And you are ... Hex?
HEX: Yeah. Short for Hector. Thomas Hector Schofield.
ACE: And your friend's name?
ACE: Call me Ace.
ALBERT: Ace?
HEX: Yeah. She wouldn't tell me her real name either.

(Walking in.)
ALBERT: I'm back, dear.
PEGGY: Who is it? Is it...?
ALBERT: No, no. It's a young gentleman Hex, and his friend Ace.
PEGGY: Why do young people have to have such funny names?
ALBERT: You can hardly talk, love. You wouldn't have me in the house if I started going round calling you "Margaret."
(He chuckles.)
PEGGY: That's different. Everybody's always called me Peggy, and I don't like that name. Reminds me of that woman.
ACE: Nice to meet you, Peggy.
ALBERT: They were wondering if they might use our telephone.
PEGGY: Well, they're welcome to try, but I can't even get through to our Dot now.
ALBERT: They said the phone's only for emergencies. I hardly think calling your sister counts.
PEGGY: I suppose whatever these young people need the telephone for is an emergency.
ACE: It is, yes, I'm afraid.
PEGGY: Oh, in that case, follow me.
(Walking off.)
ACE: Thank you. You're very kind.
HEX: Nice place you've got 'ere.
ALBERT: Yes. We've been here for five years, ever since I retired.
HEX: If you don't mind me asking though, why are you digging up your lawn? Decided to go for vegetables?
ALBERT: No. It's to fill the cardboard boxes.
HEX: The what?
ALBERT: We're supposed to pile them up against the walls of our fallout room, to keep out the radiation.
HEX: What did you just say?

ACE: Hello?
(Tapping phone button.)
ACE: Is there anyone there? Hello? Hello?
PEGGY: No luck, dear?
(Receiver replaced.)
ACE: No. I'm not even getting an engaged tone.
PEGGY: Yes, it's been like that for the last hour. I expect one of the wires has come down. We're always getting cut off in storms.
ACE: Has there been a storm?
PEGGY: No. Odd that. I'm sorry if you can't phone your friends. Would a cup of tea help?
ACE: Oh yeah, that would be lovely, thank you.
(Walking in.)
HEX: Ace, you're never going to believe...
PEGGY: Feet! On the newspapers.
(Feet wiped on newspapers.)
HEX: Sorry.
PEGGY: It's bad enough with Albert without everyone else tramping dirt in. I was just making some tea. Would you like a cup?
HEX: What? Er, yeah, that'd be fantastic.
PEGGY: Well, I don't know about fantastic, but I'll do me best.
(Moves off.)
HEX: Ace, there's something going on here, something weird.
ACE: You're telling me. The phone's dead.
HEX: Dead? Who were you trying to call anyway?
ACE: UNIT. What do you mean, something weird?
HEX: The old fella out there, he says he's building a fallout shelter.
ACE: A fallout shelter?
HEX: Yeah. Like in a nuclear war.

(Male announcer on radio.)
THE ANNOUNCER: Your first priority is to make a fallout room to protect you from radioactive fallout. This should be in the room in your home which is furthest away from the exterior walls and roof. If you have a basement, use that.
PEGGY: Here you go, love.
(Cup put down.)
PEGGY: You can do your own milk and sugar.
HEX: Peggy, your husband said he's building a fallout shelter.
PEGGY: Oh, that. Waste of time if you ask me, but he says we have to be prepared.
ACE: You think there's going to be a nuclear war?
PEGGY: No, but it doesn't matter what I think. The Government says we have to. They even put a leaflet through our front door.
HEX: Can I see this leaflet?
PEGGY: Didn't you get one? I think Albert had it.
ALBERT: What's that, love?
PEGGY: The leaflet, the one from the Government, have you got it?
ALBERT: Here.
(Rustling of paper.)
ALBERT: What's the matter?
HEX: Protect And Survive. What to do to make you and your family as safe as possible in the event of a nuclear attack.
ACE: I think I heard about that once in a documentary. It was a thing in the early Eighties. But the leaflets were never sent out, I'm sure.
PEGGY: No dear, we got this one through - when was it?
ALBERT: The day before yesterday.
PEGGY: That's right. Maybe they haven't sent them out yet where you live.
THE ANNOUNCER: Use thick dense materials to make the walls of your fallout room thicker, to protect against radiation. Use bricks, concrete blocks, timber, or boxes of earth and sand.
ACE: But why? Why are you building the shelter?
PEGGY: Because it's our best chance if the worst comes to the worst. Haven't you seen the News?
HEX: No. I'm afraid I've been a bit busy.
PEGGY: Both of you?
ACE: Yes.
PEGGY: What do you do, by the way?
HEX: I'm a nurse, and Ace here ... Well, she...
ACE: I travel, a lot. So tell us, what's been happening in the News?
PEGGY: We don't have time to sit around talking all day. I've got to tape up the windows and Albert still has to move the boxes.
HEX: Look, how about Ace and I help you out? Might as well make ourselves useful while we're here.
PEGGY: Well, I suppose an extra pair of hands would come in useful.
ALBERT: Well then, boxes is in the garden, lad.
ACE: Go on, Hex. You could do with beefing up a bit.
HEX: Ah, go bake a cake.
(Walking off.)
PEGGY: Right then, young lady, windows it is. Reckon I've got a spare pinny somewhere.
ACE: Pinny?
PEGGY: You don't want to be getting your clean things mucky.
ACE: All right, whatever. But while we're about it, you can tell us everything that's been going on.

(Outside, bird song.)
ALBERT: All those boxes are to go along the living-room wall, same side as the stairs.
HEX: Same side as the stairs. Got yer.
(Lifting.)
HEX: You think there's really going to be a war?
ALBERT: I don't know. I think the politicians are damn fool enough to do anything, particularly our lot.
HEX: And you think this shelter's going to make a difference?
ALBERT: Well, that's what the Government are saying. You know what I think? I think it's just a big bluff.
HEX: A bluff?
ALBERT: We've got to show the Russkies that we're serious. We're not going to back down. That's why they've sent out the leaflets - to show them we mean business.

PEGGY: I'm trying to think back to how it all started. Here love, you hold the chair while I get the net curtains.
ACE: You sure you don't want me to do it?
PEGGY: No, no - they're my curtains.
(Moving curtains.)
PEGGY: Then you can help me put them in the airing cupboard. I don't want them getting any paint on them.
ACE: Paint? What paint?
THE ANNOUNCER: You must also prepare the rest of your house to limit the damage from heat and blast. Remove anything flammable, such as net curtains, newspapers and magazines. You should then coat the windows with diluted white paint to reflect the heat flash.
PEGGY: Yes, that was it. It was all something to do with the uprisings they were having in all those Eastern Bloc countries like Poland and Hungary and Czechoslovakia.
ACE: Yeah, I remember - there were all the protests for democracy.
PEGGY: Well, the Russian President, he told them all to go home, and when they didn't, he sent in the tanks.

(Outside.)
ALBERT: I remember seeing it on the News. They just opened fire on the demonstrators, even the children.
HEX: At the orders of the Soviet President?
ALBERT: What?
HEX: Gorbachev?
ALBERT: No. General Secretary Vladimir Khrushchev. I remember the name because he sounds like a James Bond villain. And then there were more demonstrations in East Germany along the Berlin Wall, and so the Russians went into West Berlin, to restore order, or so they said.

PEGGY: But this meant all the American bases in West Berlin were now controlled by the Russians, so the Americans gave the Russians an ultimatum.

(Outside.)
ALBERT: And then one of our satellites spots that there are Soviet tanks gathering on the border with West Germany, at a town called Helmsted. For defence, the Soviets say, but by then it's too late, as the Americans have dropped a bomb on it. What they call a battlefield nuclear weapon.

PEGGY: That was three days ago. The News has been quiet ever since. I think they're deciding what to do next.
(Sound of paint tin and painting with brush.)
ACE: And it all started with the uprisings. So it's Nineteen Eighty-Nine?
PEGGY: Yes. The Ninth of November. Don't you even know that?
ACE: So, what do we do after we've whitewashed the windows?

THE ANNOUNCER: Inside your fallout room, you should prepare an inner refuge, to give you extra protection during the first two days after the attack, when the danger from radiation is most critical.

(Dragging.)
ALBERT: Careful. Watch your step. It's very steep.
HEX: Oh, nice fallout shelter, mate. Liking it.
ALBERT: Just put the box by the entrance of the inner refuge, but not blocking the way in.
(Box put down.)
HEX: You planning on spending two weeks down 'ere?
ALBERT: No. The inner refuge is just for the first two days. For the rest of the two weeks, we're allowed to use the rest of the room.
HEX: Wow. Luxury. And then what?
ALBERT: And then they'll sound the all-clear, and we can come out.
HEX: If there's anything left.
ALBERT: I wouldn't worry, lad. Nothing's going to actually happen.
HEX: Yeah. Either that, or you're dead no matter what you do, and this is just their way of keeping you busy.

THE ANNOUNCER: You will need to store enough food and water in your fallout room for each member of your family for fourteen days. Choose foods which can be eaten cold, and which are tinned or well-wrapped. Don't forget to make sure you have a tin-opener in your inner refuge.
(Rummaging.)
ACE: Tin-opener, tin-opener ... Here.
PEGGY: Any more bottles, love?
ACE: No, the only other thing I could find was a watering-can.
PEGGY: Mm ... I suppose it counts as a container.
ACE: Is all this for you and Albert?
(Running water from a tap.)
PEGGY: What's that, dear?
ACE: Only, the leaflet says three and a half gallons per person, and you must have stored more than twice that.
(Tap turned off. PEGGY sobs.)
ACE: Oh, I'm sorry. Have I said something wrong?
PEGGY: No dear, it ... When you arrived we were expecting, hoping, for someone else to turn up.
ACE: Who?
PEGGY: My son Raymond and his wife Joanna. They said they'd come up to stay with us but I haven't heard from them for two days. They live in London, you see, but the radio's been saying that the motorways are for essential services only.
ACE: Oh, I'm sorry. I'm sure he's on his way.
PEGGY: That's very kind of you to say, dear. It's funny. He's a grown man now, but when I picture him I still see a little boy playing Cowboys and Indians in the garden. Just underneath that apple tree out the back.
ACE: He must have had a wonderful childhood growing up here.
PEGGY: Couldn't wait to leave though, first chance he got.
(Walking over.)
ALBERT: Inner refuge finished and ready for inspection, Ma'am.
PEGGY: You're not getting me down that cellar, Albert Marsden, you can carry the water down there yourself.
(Walking over too.)
HEX: It's all right. I'll help.
ALBERT: No, lad. You've done enough.
PEGGY: And then you can clear all the newspapers from the hall.
ACE: Why don't you let us do that? We can do it on our way out.
PEGGY: Are you leaving us, love?
ACE: Well, if we're walking to the next town, we should make a start.
PEGGY: Well, if you're sure. The newspapers, they go in the garage. Albert bundles them up for the Scouts to do recycling.
ACE: Okay, and thanks, for being so kind.
PEGGY: Not at all, dear. It's been nice having someone to talk to other than the radio.
ALBERT: That radio. Never stops.
ACE: Yes. I hope you don't have to wait too much longer. Goodbye.
(Walking off.)
HEX: Yeah. Cheers.
PEGGY: Goodbye, and good luck.

(Door opened.)
HEX: So why were you so keen to clear away the newspapers?
ACE: Isn't it obvious? To find out what's been going on.
(Rustling of paper.)
ACE: Hmm ... Three days ago. Parliament passes Emergency Powers Act. All airports are to be closed? All hospitals are to be cleared of non-critical patients to make room for expected casualties.
(Rustling of paper.)
HEX: Four days ago. Following widespread panic buying of petrol, Number Ten has announced that the remaining supplies are to be restricted to official vehicles. Stocks of tinned food are at a critical level.
ACE: Anti-war demonstrations in London, Manchester and Liverpool end in riots and looting. Curfews are now imposed in all cities.
(Rustling of paper.)
HEX: Yesterday. The Archbishop of Canterbury has appealed for calm and prayers for peace as the Government places all emergency services on standby.
(Rustling of paper.)
ACE: Ah ... Ah, today. The Prime Minister has flown to Paris for a meeting of NATO but remains optimistic of a diplomatic solution. Foreign Office sources refuse to confirm reports of a series of nuclear explosions in the Middle East.
HEX: But none of this ever happened.
ACE: No. Something's wrong.
HEX: Maybe - I don't know - we're in a parallel universe.
ACE: Or something has changed the course of history, bringing the world to the brink of nuclear war.
HEX: But it's not going to happen, is it? I mean, no-one would ever really push the button, would they?
(Soaring overhead.)
ACE: Oh, I hope you're right, Hex, because whatever's going on, we're stuck here for the foreseeable future.
HEX: No. No, there's still a way out. The TARDIS.

ALBERT: Have they gone, dear?
PEGGY: They're just off down the lane. Pity. I liked them.
ALBERT: Don't worry, love. They'll be back soon enough. It's not as if there's anywhere else they can go.

THE ANNOUNCER: If an attack with nuclear weapons is expected, you will hear the following sound.
(Alarm hooter sound.)
THE ANNOUNCER: If you are at home when you hear this sound, turn off the gas and electricity at the mains, and go to your fallout room. If you are not at home, but can get there within two minutes, do so. Otherwise take cover at your place of work. If you are in the open, take cover in the nearest building. If you cannot reach a building, lie flat on the ground, and cover your head with your hands.

(Soaring of jet. Walking outside.)
HEX: Come on. It should just be around the next corner.
ACE: It's gone. The TARDIS has gone.
HEX: It must have dematerialised, without us.
ACE: But it can't have.
HEX: Yeah. Unless...
ACE: Unless what?
HEX: Unless the Doctor was still in it.
ACE: The Doctor wouldn't abandon us.
HEX: No?
ACE: No. We can't hang around here. We have to make contact with UNIT somehow.
HEX: What do you suggest? We walk to the next town?
ACE: Walk? Don't you know how to drive?

(Metal being moved aside as garage door is opened.)
HEX: You're not going to nick Albert's car?
ACE: Borrow, that's all.
HEX: You can't hot-wire a Morris Minor. It's practically vintage.
ACE: I don't have to.
(Clink of key set.)
HEX: Hey! Where did you get those?
ACE: Toby Jug on the sideboard. I thought, just in case. Oh, get in, will you?
HEX: Look, I'm not sure about this.
ALBERT: Glad to hear it, lad.
ACE: Oh, rumbled. Albert, sorry about this, but we don't have any choice. We'll make sure you get it back.
ALBERT: No, young lady. You give it back right now.
(Scraping of metal.)
HEX: Albert, mate, put the spade down, eh?
ALBERT: Go on, get out of it.
ACE: You keep on swinging that thing about, you'll ruin your paint work.
ALBERT: I'll paint work you, young lady.
(Alarm hooter sound.)
ACE: What's that?
HEX: Oh no!
ALBERT: That's the air attack warning. Oh my...
ACE: Then it's really happening.
HEX: Ace? Ace! They've only gone and started World War Three.

THE ANNOUNCER: Air attack warning. Go to your fallout room or take shelter. Do not panic. Stay calm. This is not a test.
(Message repeats.)
PEGGY: Albert, we have to close all the doors, the windows too.
ACE: Hello again, Peggy.
PEGGY: Oh. You came back, both of you.
HEX: Yeah.
(Message repeats.)
HEX: We were hoping you might have room for us in your shelter.
ALBERT: You expect us to take you in...
PEGGY: We can hardly leave them outside.
ALBERT: I suppose not, but...
ACE: Thanks. You're a life-saver.
PEGGY: Oh! Oh my! The box, with our birth certificates. It's upstairs.
ALBERT: You'll have to leave it, love.
PEGGY: It'll only take a minute. You go and do the gas and the electric.
ALBERT: No, love. We've got to go down to the inner refuge.
ACE: He's right, Peggy.
PEGGY: What about the kitchen? We didn't do the kitchen.
HEX: Peggy, love, we have to get into the basement.
ALBERT: Now!
PEGGY: Don't you raise your voice, Albert Marsden. I'm going, all right? I'm going.
ACE: Wait. The radio. It's stopped. Maybe it was a false alarm.
ALBERT: No. The first part of an air attack will consist of a warhead being detonated in the atmosphere to knock out communication systems with an electromagnetic pulse. That's what the leaflet says.
HEX: Ace, it's really happening. Ace!
ALBERT: Into the shelter, both of you.
(Gasps.)
ALBERT: The light!
(Whining.)
ACE: Don't look at it. Hex!
HEX: I can see the bones in my hand, like an X-ray.
ACE: Hex, close your eyes!
HEX: I'm closing them. I'm closing them.
ACE: No. It's all right. The light's gone now. It's safe for you to open your eyes again.
HEX: What? But ... I can't see!
ALBERT: We've got to get into the inner refuge, before the heat blast hits.
ACE: The heat blast? That wasn't it?
ALBERT: It's like lightning. You get the flash then the bang follows. Come on!
(Sealing of door.)
ACE: Door's bolted.
HEX: Ace, I can't see. I can't see the stairs!
(Walking slowly.)
ACE: Just keep hold of my shoulders. Step, step, step. Nearly there.
PEGGY: Albert?
ALBERT: It's all right, love. I'm here beside you.
ACE: Budge up in there. Here it comes!
(Sound of nuclear blast.)

(Closing Doctor Who theme music composed by Keff McCulloch, with no announcer.)

PART TWO

(Opening Doctor Who theme music composed by Keff McCulloch, with no announcer.)

(Sealing of door.)
ACE: Door's bolted.
HEX: Ace, I can't see. I can't see the stairs!
(Walking slowly.)
ACE: Just keep hold of my shoulders. Step, step, step. Nearly there.
PEGGY: Albert?
ALBERT: It's all right, love. I'm here beside you.
ACE: Budge up in there. Here it comes!
(Sound of nuclear blast. Gasps of fright.)
ACE: Everyone all right? Albert?
ALBERT: I'm fine. Heart's going like the clappers, though.
ACE: Peggy?
PEGGY: I don't like it. Make it stop.
ALBERT: Hush. It's all right, dear. I'm with you.
PEGGY: Albert, I'm shaking.
ALBERT: That's just the shock, Peggy love. That's all.
ACE: Hex, what about you?
HEX: Still can't see anything.
ACE: None of us can. It's pitch black down here.
ALBERT: Hold on. I've got a torch here somewhere. Here it is. We can only use it for a few minutes. We mustn't waste it.
ACE: Hex, can you see the light?
HEX: What light?
ACE: The one I'm shining directly in your eyes.
HEX: (upset) No. I'm never gonna see again, am I?
ACE: (sigh) I did tell you not to look.
HEX: (upset) Thanks for the sympathy.
ACE: Oh, I'm sorry. Try not to worry about it. It's probably only temporary.
HEX: Yeah, and if it's not?
(Shuffling off.)
PEGGY: Albert? Where are you going?
ALBERT: I've got to check upstairs.
PEGGY: No! You'll die up there.
ACE: Your wife's right, Albert.
ALBERT: No, it's in the leaflet. After the attack there'll be a brief period before fallout descends. Use this time to check your home for small fires and damage.
ACE: Okay, I'll go with you. Hex, you...
HEX: I know, I know. Wait here.
PEGGY: No! Albert, don't leave me.
ALBERT: I'll be back before you know it. Hex will look after you.
PEGGY: I want you.
ALBERT: Come on Ace, I'll go first. You stay close behind. And careful where you're treading on the steps.
(Walking up. Opening door. Coughing.)
ACE: Are you sure this is safe?
(Door closed.)
ALBERT: If it says so in the leaflet, must be.
ACE: Oh. The wallpaper, it's all blackened and shrivelled.
ALBERT: Good job Peggy can't see what's happened to the carpet.
(Coughing.)
ACE: Where do we look first?
ALBERT: Living-room.
(More coughing from ALBERT.)
ACE: Oh, the ... TV, all the plastic and metal has fused together. Force of the wind must have put out any fires.
ALBERT: The photos on the mantelpiece of our wedding day. The glass has melted. Even the photos.
ACE: Come along. Can't hang around here. Where next?

(Sighing.)
HEX: That's it. Deep, slow breaths.
PEGGY: Why haven't they come back? What if they never come back?
HEX: They will. Your husband's safe with Ace. She saved my life more times than I can remember.
PEGGY: Are you and her...?
HEX: Er, no. She'd have me for breakfast. Anyway, there's never any time for stuff like that when you're travelling with the Doctor.
PEGGY: The Doctor?
HEX: A mate of ours. We travel around together. Or we did.
PEGGY: Did?
HEX: We seem to have lost him somewhere down the line. Or he lost us.

(ALBERT coughing.)
ACE: Are you all right?
(ALBERT wheezing cough.)
ALBERT: Just the smoke.
(ALBERT coughs. Walking around, crunchy underfoot.)
ACE: This must be where the blast came in. The windows are completely gone. No fires though.
ALBERT: Look outside.
ACE: Oh no. A mushroom cloud.
ALBERT: That's the RAF base. It's about twenty miles away. Must have been a target.
ACE: The cloud. It must be a mile high.
ALBERT: I can't hear any birds. They've killed all the birds.
(Rain starts.)
ACE: Albert?
ALBERT: And the apple tree.
ACE: Albert? Listen to me. Was there anything else we had to do while we were out here?
ALBERT: I ... Oh, I can't think.
(Faint whine.)
ACE: Someone's shooting.
ALBERT: No. That's the fallout warning. We have to get back to the inner refuge. You're not to mention any of this to Peggy. Any of it. You understand?

THE ANNOUNCER: After a nuclear explosion there will be a cloud of deadly dust, called fallout. It can be carried by winds for hundreds of miles before falling to the ground. The radiation from this dust cannot be seen, felt or smelt, but exposure to it, even for a few minutes, can cause sickness, and even death.

PEGGY: So, this friend of yours, he's still out there?
(PEGGY sobs.)
HEX: Don't know. I suppose so.
PEGGY: Like our Raymond.
HEX: No. Don't you go upsetting yourself.
PEGGY: If they dropped a bomb here, goodness knows what they've done to London.
HEX: Listen to me. You've got to be strong. 'Cause you don't know, he's ... he's probably on his way.
(Door opens. PEGGY slight gasp.)
ALBERT: It's all right, love. It's us.
PEGGY: Albert.
(Door closed.)
HEX: Ace. What's it like up there?
(Walking downstairs.)
ALBERT: It's not actually that bad. A few broken windows, that's all. Isn't that right, Ace?
ACE: Yeah, that's right.
PEGGY: Oh. I - I thought it would be more than that, from the sound.
(Rustling.)
HEX: What are you doing?
ALBERT: Sealing the inner refuge. We'll have to sit tight in here now.
PEGGY: Oh, my throat's all dry. Could do with a cup of tea.
ALBERT: Peggy love, we've no way of boiling the water.
PEGGY: I suppose not. Could you pass one of those bottles, Hex?
HEX: You're going to have to give me a bit more to go on.
PEGGY: By your head.
(Rummaging.)
HEX: Right. Got one.
PEGGY: Oh.
HEX: Here.
ALBERT: Careful, love. That's got to last.
(Drinking.)
ACE: Hex? You still can't see?
HEX: Not a thing.
ACE: Don't worry. When the Doctor gets here, he'll sort you out.
HEX: I wish I had your faith.
ALBERT: I'm sorry. Who are you talking about?
PEGGY: They have a friend, called the Doctor.
ALBERT: The Doctor?
ACE: And I know that wherever he is, he'll be doing his best to find us.

THE ANNOUNCER: The first two days will be the most dangerous. Remain within your inner refuge, no matter how uncomfortable it may be. If you have to leave your inner refuge for water, food or sanitation, make sure your time outside in the fallout room is as brief as possible. Do not leave the fallout room under any circumstances.

HEX: How long's it been?
ALBERT: Hang on. I'll look. It's just gone eleven. So it's about twelve hours.
PEGGY: Albert, do you think we should look outside?
ALBERT: We're not supposed to, love, remember? The fallout.
PEGGY: But what if Raymond's come? He'll be wondering where we've got to.
ALBERT: We'd have heard his car, dear.
PEGGY: Yes, I suppose so. Could I have another one of those pills?
ALBERT: You've still got that headache?
PEGGY: Yes. It's worse now.
ALBERT: You're not meant to take more than two every four hours. You'll have to wait, I'm afraid.
ACE: Er, what's he like, your Raymond?
ALBERT: What's he like?
ACE: What does he do?
PEGGY: Oh, something with computers. He's tried explaining it to us, but it's too complicated.
ALBERT: Computers are the future. He's always said. He studies them at University.
PEGGY: We've got a photo of him somewhere. Excuse me.
HEX: Ow! Hey, careful. Squeezed in here.
PEGGY: Sorry, love. Can you pass me that book by your shoulder?
HEX: Which shoulder?
PEGGY: Oh, sorry. Left.
HEX: Here.
PEGGY: There.
(Photo passed.)
PEGGY: That's our Raymond and Joanna at their wedding.
ACE: He's very handsome.
PEGGY: It was only a small do. Raymond's never been one for making friends. We were ever so happy when he found Joanna, weren't we?
ALBERT: Two proper lovebirds, they were.
PEGGY: Just like us at their age. Oh, I wish I had the photos from our wedding to show you, Ace, but they're upstairs.
ACE: Yeah, I remember seeing them.
PEGGY: He always looked so dashing in his uniform. He even wrote me a poem once.
ALBERT: Peggy!
PEGGY: No-one had ever written me a poem before.
ALBERT: Peggy, you're embarrassing me.
PEGGY: You shouldn't be embarrassed. It was very good. I think I might be able to go to sleep now.
ALBERT: Me too. What about you, Hex?
HEX: Yeah. There's not exactly a lot to stay awake for.
ALBERT: Ace?
ACE: Yeah, I'm shattered. Goodnight, Albert, Peggy.
PEGGY: Goodnight.
ALBERT: Goodnight.
(Turning, grunting. Yawning.)
ALBERT: Just had a thought. Me, going to sleep next to a young woman.
PEGGY: And me, going to sleep next to a young man.
ALBERT: See you in the morning, love.
PEGGY: See you in the morning.

THE ANNOUNCER: After two days, the danger from fallout will be reduced, and it will be relatively safe for you to spend time outside your inner refuge, but it will not be safe for you to leave your fallout room.

(Grunting of movement.)
HEX: Good to stretch me legs at least. Cooped up in there, I was getting cramp.
ACE: Peggy? How are you feeling today?
PEGGY: Still a bit shivery.
ALBERT: That's just the stress, love, wears you out.
PEGGY: And I was sick in the night, twice.
ALBERT: Lucky we've got our own private nurse to look after you.
HEX: Yeah. You just try and get some rest.
PEGGY: I've been lying down for two days. I'm fed up of rest. What I need is fresh air.
ACE: We all do. Sitting in the dark does your head in.
HEX: Tell me about it.
ACE: It's not my fault you can't see, Hex.
HEX: No. It's my own stupid fault. That's the worst thing about it. Well, the second worst, after not being able to see.
ALBERT: Calm down, lad.
HEX: Calm down? For all we know we're the last four people left.
ACE: We survived. There will be other survivors.
HEX: Oh, and you're sure of that, are you? Just like you were sure that the Doctor would turn up and rescue us?
ACE: He will.
HEX: Well, he's taking his time about it, that's all I can say.
ACE: The Doctor will find us.
HEX: When? After a week? A month? A year? Assuming we're still alive by then, assuming the Doctor's still alive.
ALBERT: The lad does have a point. If your friend was out there...
ACE: He wasn't out there. I don't know where he is, but he wasn't out there.
HEX: Ace, he vanished from the TARDIS. For all we know, he's been kidnapped by...
PEGGY: What's the TARDIS?
HEX: It's like our spaceship. We travel in Time and Space.
ACE: Hex!
HEX: We might as well tell them. What difference will it make?
ALBERT: You travel through Time, in a spaceship?
HEX: Yeah. You know that Police Box you saw us in? That was it.
ALBERT: Bit small, innit?
HEX: It's bigger on the inside. It moved by disappearing from one place, and reappearing somewhere else.
ALBERT: So where do you go in this TARDIS of yours?
HEX: All over. Different times, different planets.
PEGGY: And is that where you're from? A different planet?
ACE: I'm from this time, more or less. Hex is from the future.
ALBERT: So you know what's going to happen. If this is all in the past to you...
HEX: I'm afraid not. This isn't my past.
PEGGY: What does he mean, Albert?
HEX: In the history we come from, there were all these uprisings in Eastern Europe, but the Soviet President was a guy called Gorbachev. His attitude was that if these people wanted out, he wasn't going to stand in their way.
ACE: And so the Soviet Union split up, and they pulled down the Berlin Wall.
ALBERT: Pulled down the Berlin Wall?
ACE: Yes. That's what should be happening right now.
PEGGY: Have to say, I much prefer your version of history.
ALBERT: But if that's what's supposed to happen, then why hasn't it?
(Coughing.)
ACE: I don't know.
HEX: Something to do with Khrushchev being in charge.
PEGGY: Sorry, Albert. (Cough.) I need a handkerchief.
ALBERT: Peggy, it's all right. It doesn't matter.
PEGGY: My mouth ... It-it's blood. My gums are bleeding.
HEX: One of the first symptoms of radiation sickness. All the time we spent in the inner refuge, it wasn't enough. The radiation's in here with us. We've all received a lethal dose.

ACE: How are they now?
HEX: I can still feel Peggy's pulse, but it's weak.
(Faint rasping breath from ALBERT.)
HEX: Albert's having respiratory problems. How did he look to you? Ace?
ACE: I'm doing my best. Torch is dying on me. Their skin's red, all covered in blisters.
HEX: They haven't got long left. What about you?
ACE: Me?
HEX: You don't have to put on an act for me. What about you?
ACE: Well ... I've looked better. Weirdest thing is that when I woke up there was a lot of hair on my pillow. Let me tell you, the skinhead look doesn't suit me.
(HEX laugh.)
HEX: I wish I could see it. What time is it now?
ACE: Mm, about four o'clock.
HEX: Morning or night?
ACE: Morning, I - I think.
HEX: So we've been down here a week?
ACE: I suppose so.
PEGGY: Albert? Albert?
ACE: It's all right. He's right next to you.
PEGGY: Who are you? Are you the nurse?
ACE: I'm Ace, remember?
PEGGY: Water, please. Water.
ACE: Here. Careful. Drink it slowly.
(Drinking, coughing.)
ACE: It's all right, Peggy. The Doctor will be here soon. He'll save us, I know he will.
HEX: Well, he'd better get a move on, because in a couple of more days, there won't be anyone left to save.

THE ANNOUNCER: If the all-clear has not been sounded, and anyone dies while you were in the fallout room, move the body to another room in the house. Wrap the body in polythene, paper or blankets, and label it with name and address. However, if the body has been in the house for more than five days, you should bury the body outside.

(Door opened.)
ACE: Okay. It's opened. Now, lift.
(Grunting.)
HEX: I'm trying. He was a heavy guy.
ACE: On my word. Now.
(They grunt.)
ACE: To me, that's it. Follow the sound of my voice. To me. Okay. You can put him down now.
(Gasps with relief.)
HEX: Can't believe how knackered I am. My arms are killing me.
ACE: We'll go downstairs, get our energy back, then get Peggy.
HEX: Okay. Good plan. What's it like outside?
ACE: Grey. Can't see the sky. It's all misted over. There's a sort of ... ash over everything, like it's been snowing.
HEX: Maybe it has. It's freezing.
ACE: Oh yeah. And we thought it was cold in...
(Signal.)
HEX: Another attack?
ACE: No. It's a single note. Hex, it's the all-clear.
THE ANNOUNCER: (from inside) When there is no immediate danger of air attack or fallout, an all-clear warning will sound, and you may resume normal activities.
HEX: Normal activities? They've got to be joking.
ACE: Yeah. For all we know, we're the only people left alive.
HEX: Except whoever's making all the radio announcements.
ACE: Oh, they're all pre-recorded. That doesn't mean anything.
HEX: Hang on a minute. Just before the attack, I thought, all the communications were knocked out.
ACE: Yeah. By an electromagnetic pulse.
HEX: So how come we can still hear these announcements? Where's the radio?
ACE: Kitchen, I think. Here. I'll guide you.
(Walking.)
ACE: Mind the step.
HEX: Thanks.
ACE: The whole place has been gutted, except for the radio.
HEX: That's impossible. The explosion couldn't destroy everything else and leave it intact.
ACE: Then someone must have left it here.
HEX: Who?
ACE: I don't know.
(Checking apparatus.)
ACE: It must be running on battery power. I don't believe it.
HEX: What is it?
ACE: There aren't any batteries. It's empty.
HEX: But we heard it. We heard the voice of the announcer.
ACE: Hex, we were in the basement for nine days, and it never occurred to any of us to notice that there was anything strange about the fact that the radio was still working.
HEX: Well, we had other stuff to worry about.
ACE: For nine days? No. Something was preventing us from noticing. And there's something else. Listen.
(Silence.)
HEX: I can't hear anything.
ACE: The wind's stopped. Not even a breeze.
(Breeze starts up again. Shivering.)
HEX: It's back now.
ACE: Yes. But it's changed. The wind was blowing into the house through where the windows used to be.
HEX: Yeah. I remember. And it's coming from the opposite direction.
(THE ANNOUNCER talking backwards.)
HEX: What's gone wrong with the radio?
ACE: Hex, I think I know what's happening.
HEX: You do? Well, you wouldn't mind letting me in on it, would yer?
ACE: Everything's being rewound. Time is running backwards.
(ACE gasps.)
HEX: What is it?
ACE: Albert's body. It's gone.
(Wind stops, door opened.)
ACE: Hex, you stay at the top of the stairs.
HEX: What's going on down there?
ACE: It's Albert and Peggy. They're both asleep.
HEX: So time's gone back to the point when they were still alive?
(THE ANNOUNCER in another room talking backwards.)
HEX: Ace, what's happening?
(Reverse speech.)
ACE: Albert and Peggy, they're moving about, backwards. But they can't see me. They're like ghosts, on non-exposure photographs.
(Reverse whining.)
HEX: What was that?
ACE: The fallout warning. And we're back upstairs, in the kitchen.
HEX: So now it's just after the explosion?
ACE: The cooker, the microwave - they're all sucking the smoke from the air. They're all on fire, but the fire is returning them to normal. Hex, watch out!
HEX: Watch out for what?
ACE: All the fires have gone out. The glass is re-forming in the windows. Outside the dust cloud - it's rushing away from us.
HEX: It's over.
ACE: Not quite. The light!
(HEX gasps. Bird song.)
HEX: I can see! I can see again!
ACE: And listen - even the birds are back.
HEX: Never mind the birds. I thought I was blinded for life. Oh, it's a bloomin' miracle! Hey, the clouds. There's something weird about 'em.
ACE: Time's still going backwards, and getting faster.
HEX: Albert and Peggy - they're back.
ACE: Taking the whitewash off the windows, returning the water to the taps.
HEX: Carrying boxes of earth out of the basement, and ... shovelling them back into the ground.
(Soaring sound, then stops.)
ACE: We're back. Back at the point where we first arrived.
HEX: What the hell is going on 'ere?
ACE: Isn't it obvious? We're stuck in a time loop.
HEX: If this is when we first arrived, then the TARDIS should still be here.
ACE: Come on!
(Panting after running.)
ACE: Nope. No sign of it.
HEX: Maybe we've gone back too far. Maybe we haven't landed yet.
ACE: Yeah. Or when the TARDIS vanished it left this place, never to return.
HEX: This place?
ACE: Wherever we are, Hex, this isn't Earth. Not our Earth.
HEX: Then what is it?
ALBERT: Hello?
HEX: It's all happening over again, like when we first got 'ere.
ACE: Then that settles it. The TARDIS isn't coming back.
ALBERT: You mean that Police Box of yours? The one you arrived in?
ACE: Albert. You remember. You know who we are.
ALBERT: Of course I know who you are. Just because we've gone back to square one that doesn't mean we forget.

THE ANNOUNCER: Your first priority is to make a fallout room to protect you from radioactive fallout.
(As THE ANNOUNCER continues with this, they speak over it)
THE ANNOUNCER: This should be in the room in your home which is furthest away from the exterior walls and roof. If you have a basement, use that.
PEGGY: Yes. We go through the same ten days, over and over again.
HEX: The same ten days?
ALBERT: The day before the war, then the explosion, then nine days in the fallout room, and then we die.
PEGGY: Then we go back to the start and do it all again.
ACE: Then why didn't you tell us? Why didn't you warn us that would happen?
PEGGY: Well, there didn't seem to be any point, to be honest.
ALBERT: After all, you'd be finding out for yourself soon enough.
HEX: I thought I was permanently blinded. I thought we were all dying. And you didn't want to spoil the surprise?
PEGGY: How about a cup of tea? You can do your own milk and sugar.
HEX: I don't want tea. I want answers.
ALBERT: Answers?
ACE: Where are we? What's going on here?
PEGGY: Well, I suppose you would say, we're in a kind of prison.
HEX: A prison?
ACE: But what is it? Some sort of virtual reality?
ALBERT: It's hard to explain. It's like a dimension all of itself.
ACE: A parallel universe.
ALBERT: Not a whole universe. Not even a whole planet.
PEGGY: Just us, and our house, and everything you see around us, and then only for ten days.
THE ANNOUNCER: Use thick dense materials...
HEX: Okay, if this is a prison, then why are you two here?
PEGGY: Well, that's just it, dear. We don't know.
ALBERT: Haven't the faintest.
ACE: You must have some idea. Who made this place? Who put you here?
PEGGY: It's rather hard to say. It was all so long ago.
HEX: Try.
ALBERT: All I can remember is, that it was evil, utterly evil.
PEGGY: Yes. It would have to have been for it to have created this place and put us here.
ACE: But this evil, what was it? Some kind of creature?
ALBERT: Yes, I think so.
HEX: Then what did it look like?
PEGGY: It was all so long ago.
ACE: You keep saying that. How long have you been here?
ALBERT: Oh, it must be ... a hundred years.
PEGGY: Yes. A hundred years at least, if not two.
ACE: This evil decided you should be forced to relive World War Three for a whole century?
PEGGY: Oh no.
ALBERT: No. We're forced to relive World War Three forever.
HEX: Forever?
PEGGY: For all eternity. Round and round we go.
ACE: But there must be some way out. There must be.
ALBERT: If there is, we've never managed to find it.
PEGGY: We were rather hoping you would tell us.
HEX: How are we supposed to know? We just landed here by accident. We're not even meant to be here.
ALBERT: But can't you leave the same way you came?
ACE: No. The TARDIS is gone.
HEX: And we don't have any way of getting it back.
PEGGY: Oh dear. Then it rather looks like you're going to be trapped here with us, doesn't it?

(Outside, bird song.)
ALBERT: All those boxes, to go along the living-room wall, same side as the stairs.
ACE: Hex, we can't just go along with things.
HEX: Then what do you suggest?
ACE: Think. What would the Doctor do if he was here?
HEX: I don't know. He'd probably be working on some incredibly complicated plan, which he can't tell us about because it all depends on us doing his dirty work without realising.
ACE: Hex...
HEX: Maybe that's what he's done 'ere. Maybe this is another one of his plans, and we just haven't been let in on the secret yet.
ACE: There's no need to be like that.
HEX: Like what? The Doctor doesn't trust us, never has.
ACE: He does.
HEX: No, he trusts us to do whatever he wants. He doesn't trust us enough to tell us what he's up to.
(Walking over.)
ALBERT: Hex, lad. Are you going to help me with these boxes or not?
HEX: Yeah, yeah. In a minute.
ACE: No, wait. Maybe that's it. Maybe if we do things differently we can break out of the time loop.
ALBERT: Won't do any good, my dear. You can't stop the bomb. Time marches on, no matter what.
ACE: Well, it's got to be worth a try. Hex?
HEX: Yeah. I'm in. So what do we do?

THE ANNOUNCER: You must also prepare the rest of your house to limit the damage from heat and blast.
(Metal clattering.)
PEGGY: Ace, what are you doing?
ACE: Getting rid of the paint. Now you can't whitewash the windows.
PEGGY: But the radio says...
ACE: You don't always have to do what the radio tells you, you know.

THE ANNOUNCER: Inside your fallout room, you should prepare an inner refuge...
(Boxes emptied.)
ALBERT: Hex! I spent all morning filling those boxes.
HEX: And now I'm emptying them.
ALBERT: But if we don't prepare the inner refuge...
HEX: What? What difference will it make?
ALBERT: We'll die.
HEX: You're going to die anyway. So why not live a little first?
(Soaring overhead.)

THE ANNOUNCER: You will need to store enough food and water in your fallout room for each member of your family for fourteen days. Choose foods which can be eaten cold, and which are tinned or well-wrapped.
PEGGY: What are you trying to do?
ACE: Mess things up. Throw out the system. Stick a spanner in the works.
PEGGY: You don't think we haven't already tried that?
ACE: Well, maybe you didn't try hard enough.
THE ANNOUNCER: Turn off the gas and electricity at the mains, and go to your fallout room.
PEGGY: The gas and electric. I'd almost forgotten.
ACE: You don't have to do what the radio...
THE ANNOUNCER: If you are in the open, take cover in the nearest building.
ACE: Hang on. This announcement.
THE ANNOUNCER: If you cannot reach a building...
ACE: It's being played earlier than it was last time.
THE ANNOUNCER: ... lie flat on the ground...
PEGGY: What do you mean?
THE ANNOUNCER: ... and cover your head with your hands.
ACE: Events are speeding up. Hex?
THE ANNOUNCER: Go to your fallout room or take shelter...
ACE: Hex, I think I've got it.
THE ANNOUNCER: Do not panic. Stay calm...
ACE: What we're doing, it's affecting the radio broadcast somehow. By trying to break the pattern, we're making things happen faster.
HEX: How?
ACE: The radio isn't just telling us what's going to happen. It's making things happen. Isn't that right, Peggy?
PEGGY: It won't make any difference. There's nothing you can do.
THE ANNOUNCER: Air attack warning...
ACE: You'd be surprised what I can do.
HEX: How do you suggest we stop it? We can't take out the batteries.
THE ANNOUNCER: Do not panic. Stay calm...
HEX: It doesn't have any batteries.
ACE: Then we smash it to pieces.
THE ANNOUNCER: This is not a test.
(ACE grunts as hitting.)
THE ANNOUNCER: Air attack warning. Go to ... fallout room or take shelter...
ACE: It's no good. It won't break.
THE ANNOUNCER: Do not panic. Stay calm...
HEX: Can't you unscrew it or something?
ACE: Give us a knife.
(Sound of metal being passed.)
THE ANNOUNCER: This is not a test...
ACE: I think I've got it.
(ACE grunts.)
THE ANNOUNCER: Air attack...
ACE: Yes!
THE DOCTOR: (radio) Nothing you do can alter or delay the course of events.
HEX: The Doctor?
THE DOCTOR: (radio) What has happened will happen, must happen. The time loop will continue until I return and deactivate it. Until then you must remain here and learn what it is to be human. Find out how it feels to suffer as a human suffers. Find out how it feels to fear as a human fears. Find out what it feels like to die.

(Closing Doctor Who theme music composed by Keff McCulloch, with no announcer.)

PART THREE

(Opening Doctor Who theme music composed by Keff McCulloch, with no announcer.)

(Carmen - Bizet playing. Digging.)
PEGGY: Albert? Cup of tea?
ALBERT: (sigh.) Thanks, love.
PEGGY: How's my brave soldier? You...
(TARDIS materialisation.)
PEGGY: What's that?
ALBERT: Wait there. I'll go and look.
(Door opens.)
ALBERT: Hello. Can I help you?
THE DOCTOR: Quite possibly.
(Door closes.)
THE DOCTOR: I'm after a little information.
ALBERT: Information?
THE DOCTOR: In an entirely official capacity, on behalf of Her Majesty's Government.
ALBERT: Right. Which is why you brought a Police Box with you.
THE DOCTOR: Eh? Oh yes - oh, don't worry, it's purely temporary.
ALBERT: Haven't seen one of these for years. Shouldn't it be blue? I don't remember seeing a black one before.
THE DOCTOR: It's a new thing. So do you live near here, Mr...?
ALBERT: Albert Marsden. We're in the cottage just up the road.
THE DOCTOR: The cottage just up the road? Then you're exactly the person I'm looking for.

ALBERT: I'm back, dear.
(Approaching him with excitement)
PEGGY: Who is it? Is it our Ray...?
ALBERT: No love. It's a man from the Government. Mr...?
THE DOCTOR: Doctor. Doctor John Smith.
ALBERT: Doctor Smith, this is my wife Margaret.
PEGGY: Please, call me Peggy. Would you like a cup of tea, Doctor Smith?
THE DOCTOR: That's very kind of you. I've had a rather long journey.
ALBERT: Yes, I've heard the traffic's bad. Radio said they'd had to close all the motorways to non-essential vehicles.
THE DOCTOR: I didn't come by motorway. If we may begin, Mr Marsden.
ALBERT: Yes. Yes of course. What can I do for you?
THE DOCTOR: I want to talk to you about the forthcoming nuclear war.

THE ANNOUNCER: Your first priority is to make a fallout room to protect you from radioactive fallout. This should be in the room in your home which is furthest away from the exterior walls and roof. If you have a basement, use that.

(Cup put down.)
PEGGY: Here you go. You can do your own milk and sugar.
ALBERT: So we just have to stock up on water and whitewash the windows, and we're done.
THE DOCTOR: Some white paint will make all the difference.
ALBERT: So you can tell them in the Government, we'll be ready for it, whatever happens.
THE DOCTOR: Yes, that's the bulldog spirit. Keep calm and carry on, fight for King and country, and keep the British end up, because it'll all be over by Christmas.
PEGGY: I don't understand.
ALBERT: I think he's making fun of us.
THE DOCTOR: Mr and Mrs Marsden, I have nothing but admiration for your courage and your kind-heartedness.
ALBERT: Just doing our bit.
THE DOCTOR: But I'm afraid it won't be enough to save you.
ALBERT: Now, look here...
(Odd faint sound of THE ANNOUNCER in the background of THE DOCTOR's next lines)
THE DOCTOR: You think a few boxes of earth will protect you from the radiation of a hydrogen bomb? And even if you do survive, what do you think the world will be like after a nuclear war? Those killed by the bombs would be considered the lucky ones.
ALBERT: You sound like one of those people on television.
PEGGY: The ones they had arrested.
THE DOCTOR: Ten thousand years of human civilisation wiped out in an instant. Every play by Shakespeare incinerated. Every painting by Michelangelo burned. Every album by The Beatles obliterated. Every achievement of the human race, every hope, every dream, every memory, reduced to ashes.
ALBERT: You can't be sure of this.
THE DOCTOR: Oh, I can. Because I've already seen it happen.

(Alarm siren sound.)
THE ANNOUNCER: If you are at home when you hear this sound, turn off the gas and electricity at the mains, and go to your fallout room. If you are not at home, but can get there within two minutes, do so. Otherwise take cover at your place of work.

(The announcement continuing on the radio while lifting papers going on in the background.)
THE ANNOUNCER: If you are in the open, take cover in the nearest building...
ALBERT: Doctor, what are you doing?
THE DOCTOR: These newspapers - you don't mind if I borrow them, do you?
THE ANNOUNCER: Lie flat on the ground, and cover your head with your hands.
ALBERT: What you said back there, about already seeing it happen. Well, what did you mean?
THE DOCTOR: Perfectly simple. I travel in Time.
ALBERT: What?
THE DOCTOR: That's why I'm here. Something has interfered with the course of history, so I have to find the source of that interference, and prevent the forthcoming war from taking place.
ALBERT: But they'd never really do it, would they? They'd never really press a button.
THE DOCTOR: Albert Marsden...?
ALBERT: Yes, Doctor?
THE DOCTOR: I suggest you take cover.
(Alarm siren.)
THE ANNOUNCER: Air attack warning. Go to your fallout room or take shelter...
PEGGY: Albert?
THE ANNOUNCER: Do not panic. Stay calm...
PEGGY: There you are. Come inside.
ALBERT: You too, Doctor.
THE ANNOUNCER: This is not a test.
ALBERT: We've got room in the inner refuge.
THE DOCTOR: No. Time I was going.
ALBERT: But if you stay out here you'll die.
THE DOCTOR: Don't worry about me. If all goes according to plan, none of this will have happened.
THE ANNOUNCER: This is not a test.
THE DOCTOR: And you and your wife will be perfectly safe.
THE ANNOUNCER: Repeat...
PEGGY: I think he's cracked.
THE ANNOUNCER: Air attack warning.
PEGGY: What did he mean? Where's he going?
ALBERT: Back the way he came. Come on, love. We've got to take shelter.
THE ANNOUNCER: This is not a test.

(TARDIS materialisation. It seems to be a Soviet military operations room.)
PETROV: Enemy missile attack, incoming.
VOICE: Lieutenant Petrov, our early warning network has detected a launch of over two hundred American and British ICBMs targeted on Soviet territory.
PETROV: But this must be some mistake, false alarm. The Americans would not launch a pre-emptive strike.
VOICE: No mistake. We have satellite and radar confirmation. The General Secretary has commanded a full retaliatory strike against NATO targets, code word Eagle, code key nineteen.
(Bleeps as this code input.)
PETROV: Code word and code key confirmed. Commencing missile launch.
(Bleeps.)
PETROV: All warheads armed and primed for launch. All missiles targeted on military targets within the United Kingdom.
VOICE: Long live the Revolution.
PETROV: Long live the Revolution. Two minutes and counting.
(He says something in Russian that sounds like "Aldeeda!".)
PETROV: How long do I have left?
VOICE: We have detected two missiles on course to Plokstine silo...
(There is static interference.)
VOICE: ... time to impact, three minutes.
PETROV: Commander Rokar? Who are you. What are you doing here?
THE DOCTOR: My name's the Doctor. I've come to see you, Raslan Petrov.
PETROV: This is a high-security area. My orders are to shoot any unauthorised personnel on sight.
THE DOCTOR: And orders must be obeyed. But before you kill me, don't you want to know why I'm here?
PETROV: Why are you here?
THE DOCTOR: To talk.
PETROV: To ... (laughs.) To talk! Hah! Here I am, two minutes, comrade.
THE DOCTOR: Two minutes until you and millions of your countrymen die.
PETROV: Yes, that is why we've launched a counter-attack on those responsible.
THE DOCTOR: And in so doing, you consign millions of innocent lives to oblivion. You sign the death warrant of the human race.
PETROV: I have my orders.
THE DOCTOR: And orders must be obeyed. But nobody will court-marshal you if you press the abort button. The responsibility's yours, and yours alone.
PETROV: It is not my decision. The General Secretary has commanded.
THE DOCTOR: The General Secretary will be dead in one minute's time along with the rest of your country and your Revolution.
PETROV: The Americans attacked first. They knew we would retaliate.
THE DOCTOR: But you don't have to. They will suffer long and hard for what they've done, but at least life will continue. Isn't it better to die in the name of comradeship than to die in the name of revenge?

(Now it seems to be a military operations room in the United States.)
AMERICAN MALE: What's the situation in Berlin? People, I need an update from Berlin.
(Female MITCHELL, communicator button pressed which amplifies her voice)
MITCHELL: (speaker) This is a Level One readiness alert. Prepare for missile launch.
THE DOCTOR: You think that likely, General Mitchell?
MITCHELL: Unless we hear from the Soviets in the next few minutes, I'd say it was a certainty. Who are you, anyway?
THE DOCTOR: I'm here with the British Ambassador. I can show you my pass if you like.
MITCHELL: You couldn't be in the War Room if you didn't have a pass.
THE DOCTOR: Exactly. But I'm a little out of the loop due to the news blackout, so if you could fill me in?
MITCHELL: Three days ago we used a tactical nuclear weapon on the Soviet base at Helmsted. Since then, they have continued to build up forces on the inner German border. Despite all diplomatic efforts they have ignored our final ultimatum to withdraw from West Berlin and East Germany.
THE DOCTOR: And the ultimatum runs out in a few minutes?
MITCHELL: Ninety seconds and counting.
THE DOCTOR: And then you intend to declare war.
MITCHELL: It's only a war if we give them a chance to fight back. Our Intelligence reports that a pre-emptive nuclear strike will take out any capacity they have for retaliation.
THE DOCTOR: Then your Intelligence is wrong. Their missiles will be in the air long before your missiles hit their targets.
MITCHELL: The point is, we've drawn a line in the sand. If we don't act now, it'll be a message to the whole world that we're not prepared to follow through on our warnings.
THE DOCTOR: You have to show them you mean business.
MITCHELL: Exactly. The President can't just sit back and do nothing in the face of enemy aggression. The people would never forgive him.
THE DOCTOR: He's backed himself into a corner, frightened of losing face.
MITCHELL: That's another point of view. History will decide which one of us is right.
THE DOCTOR: If you give the order to launch those missiles there won't be any more history.
SUTHERLAND: General Mitchell? It's time.
MITCHELL: Twelve o'clock in Berlin. Any word from the Soviet Ambassador?
SUTHERLAND: No, Ma'am. Satellites show no signs of Soviet retreat.
MITCHELL: Captain Sutherland, commence missile launch.
SUTHERLAND: Yes, Ma'am.
(Click to turn on.)
SUTHERLAND: (amplified) We are green to go. Commence missile launch. Repeat, commence missile launch. This is not a drill, this is the real deal.
(Click to turn off.)
THE DOCTOR: Don't you have to wait for authorisation from the President?
MITCHELL: We already have authorisation. The President's orders were perfectly clear.
THE DOCTOR: But you could stop this, I mean, you could wait for confirmation. You could at least check.

(People chanting "Death for the Krauts." Background sound of rain. Man with German accent, SCHUMACHER.)
SCHUMACHER: Hey.
(Gun clicks.)
SCHUMACHER: Identify yourself.
THE DOCTOR: Major Johann Schmidt. Inspection from Politburo.
SCHUMACHER: Reichstag inspection? Tonight of all nights?
THE DOCTOR: Particularly tonight of all nights. Anything to report, Sergeant Schumacher?
SCHUMACHER: Well sir, the demonstration in Alexanderplatz is growing. They're saying there's over a hundred thousand people.
THE DOCTOR: Are they indeed? What about along the wall?
SCHUMACHER: It's been as quiet as a grave, sir.
MAN: (speaker) Calling all border guards. All border guards. New orders direct from General Secretary Khrushchev. The crowd are to be ordered to disperse. If they refuse, they are to be shot. They have been declared enemies of the Revolution.
SCHUMACHER: Enemies of the Revolution.
THE DOCTOR: What's the matter, Sergeant? Do I detect some qualms about turning your guns on your own people?
SCHUMACHER: No. No, sir. If they are the orders of the General Secretary.
THE DOCTOR: But if I was to tell you what the consequences of those orders will be?
SCHUMACHER: I don't understand, sir.
THE DOCTOR: Tonight should have marked the beginning of the end of the Soviet Bloc. Instead it will mark the first step towards nuclear war.
SCHUMACHER: How do you know?
THE DOCTOR: Because that's why I'm here. Following the threads of cause and effect back to the start.
SCHUMACHER: This is tonight.
THE DOCTOR: Tonight the future hangs in the balance. One stray shot could be the snowflake that sets off the avalanche.
SCHUMACHER: You're not from the Politburo. Who are you?
THE DOCTOR: The Ghost of Christmas Yet To Come. Listen, Sergeant Schumacher. It's not too late. Open up the border crossings.
SCHUMACHER: But if I do that, I would be executed as a traitor.
THE DOCTOR: You would be a hero. You know that the demonstrators are not the enemies of the Revolution. Do you want their blood on your hands?

(Russian-accented PEGGY and ALBERT.)
PEGGY: So, Komissar Leonov. Comrade Chernenko is dead, and it is time for the Central Committee to elect a new leader.
ALBERT: History records they will choose Gorbachev. His only opposition from Romanov.
PEGGY: But history can be rewritten. We can influence every member of the committee in turn, make them select a new candidate.
ALBERT: Vladimir Khrushchev.
PEGGY: He is the one most suitable for our purpose. The most paranoid, the most belligerent, the most weak-minded.
ALBERT: (laugh) Then Khrushchev it will be.
THE DOCTOR: I wouldn't be so sure of that if I were you.
(Walking over to them.)
PEGGY: Who are you, what are you doing here? This is a private meeting.
THE DOCTOR: I'm the Doctor, and like you, I'm not of this world.
(Deep echoed voices of the ELDER GODS.)
ELDER GOD 1: So. You have come to stop us.
THE DOCTOR: Something like that.
ELDER GOD 2: You against us? Any attempt you make will be futile.
THE DOCTOR: Quite probably. You could kill me in an instant. But why bother, as I pose no threat? Now, let's see. You intend to divert the course of history to cause the destruction of all life on Earth. Which leads me to wonder three things.
ELDER GOD 2: Really?
THE DOCTOR: Firstly, who are you? Changing history's beyond the capacity of most species. So you are Elder Gods. Am I right?
ELDER GOD 2: You are correct.
THE DOCTOR: Which leads me onto my second question. Why destroy the Earth?
ELDER GOD 1: Because we can.
THE DOCTOR: Yes, I thought there wouldn't be a good reason. There never is with you. Chaos for chaos's sake. One last question. How?
ELDER GOD 2: Isn't it obvious?
THE DOCTOR: Oh, I know you have the ability to travel through Time and possess the bodies of human beings. That's pretty much par for the course. But how to change history without creating a temporal paradox.
ELDER GOD 1: It is perfectly simple. We preserve the planet's original time-line within a pocket Universe.
THE DOCTOR: Of course. How very ingenious.
ELDER GOD 1: I'm so pleased that you're impressed.
THE DOCTOR: I'm afraid that when you asked me if I'd come to try to stop you, I didn't quite tell the truth.
ELDER GOD 2: No?
THE DOCTOR: No. I'm not here to try and stop you, I'm here to tell you I already have.
ELDER GOD 1: That is quite impossible.
THE DOCTOR: Oh, I'm so pleased that you're impressed. But it wasn't that difficult. For your plan to succeed, you would have to directly influence events at several key points. I've been to the future and made sure at each of those points that history continues on its established path.
ELDER GOD 2: You expect us to believe that?
THE DOCTOR: I've already met both of you several times in the future. At the Berlin Wall, in the White House War Room, in a missile launch silo in Plokstine.
ELDER GOD 1: You're bluffing.
THE DOCTOR: Oh, well, if you're sure. You keep on doing what you're doing.
ELDER GOD 2: There is a simple way of verifying your story.
THE DOCTOR: There is?
ELDER GOD 1: We can go forward and look.
THE DOCTOR: You have a time machine?
ELDER GOD 1: We have no need of a time machine.
ELDER GOD 2: We can simply transport our minds into the bodies of some humans in the future.
(Transportation.)
MALE VOICE: New orders direct from General-Secretary Khrushchev. The crowd are to be ordered to disperse. If they refuse, they are to be shot.
(Transportation.)
MITCHELL: Twelve o'clock in Berlin. Any word from the Soviet Ambassador?
AMERICAN MALE: No, Ma'am. Satellites show no signs of Soviet retreat.
(Transportation.)
VOICE: Enemy missile attack, incoming.
PETROV: All warheads armed and primed for launch. All missiles targeted on military targets within the United Kingdom.
VOICE: Long live the Revolution.

THE ANNOUNCER: Your first priority is to make a fallout room to protect you from radioactive fallout.
(As the radio announcer continues, the Elder Gods revert to human voices.)
PEGGY: You see, Doctor? The morning of the last day before the war.
THE DOCTOR: Yes. It seems I must have miscalculated.
ALBERT: So we are successful in diverting the course of history.
PEGGY: Resulting in the absolute destruction of the planet Earth.
THE DOCTOR: Yes. Except of course this isn't the Earth.
PEGGY: What?
THE DOCTOR: You were right. I was bluffing. I just had to make you doubt things enough so that you'd want to go and check.
ALBERT: What do you mean, this isn't the Earth?
THE DOCTOR: This is the Earth that resulted from your interference. Well, not the entire planet, just the surrounding five miles or so, all sealed within a pocket dimension.
PEGGY: Doctor, what have you done?
THE DOCTOR: What have I done? I've caught you in a trap of your own making. Two future time-lines. All I had to do was make sure that you ended up in the wrong one.
ALBERT: You cannot hope to imprison us.
THE DOCTOR: Ah, I'm afraid you won't be able to time travel out of here. You're no longer Elder Gods. You're human beings.
PEGGY: Human beings?
ALBERT: These mortal bodies we inhabit. Who are they?
THE DOCTOR: A delightful couple I met called Albert and Peggy Marsden. Well, I mean, not the real Albert and Peggy. The real Albert and Peggy are safe and sound in a version of history where the nuclear war never took place.

(Transportation. Echoed voices.)
PEGGY: Albert? Cup of tea.
ALBERT: Oh. Thanks, love. I've just finished. And hey, look - we'll have roses all along the edge of the lawn come Spring.
(Sound of car horn.)
PEGGY: Can you hear that? Sounds like our Raymond's car.
ALBERT: Yes. They're early. You'll have to make another pot.
(Zooms back.)

THE DOCTOR: No, you're looking out through the eyes of the alternative Albert and Peggy from the time-line you created.
ALBERT: But why?
THE DOCTOR: Why? To give you a chance to walk in their shoes.
PEGGY: You're condemning us both to death.
THE DOCTOR: Not quite. I've time-looped this pocket dimension, so no matter what happens you always end up back at square one. Nothing you do can alter or delay the course of events. What has happened will happen, must happen.
PEGGY: You intend to trap us here forever? For all eternity?
THE DOCTOR: The time loop will continue until I return and deactivate it. Until then you must remain here and learn what it is to be human. Find out how it feels to suffer as a human suffers. Find out how it feels to fear as a human fears. Find out what it feels like to die.
PEGGY: How long must we wait?
THE DOCTOR: However long it takes. Now, if you'll excuse me, I have two friends who'll be beginning to wonder where I've got to.
(Door opened.)
THE DOCTOR: I'd start work on that fallout shelter if I were you.
(Door closed.)
PEGGY: You cannot leave us, Doctor, you cannot.
ALBERT: Have you no mercy, no compassion? No pity?
(TARDIS dematerialisation.)
ALBERT:/PEGGY: Doctor!

(Siren sounding.)
THE ANNOUNCER: Air attack warning. Go to your fallout room or take shelter. Do not panic. Stay calm. This is not a test.
(Grunts from ACE as she hits radio.)
THE ANNOUNCER: Air attack warning. Go to your fallout room...
ACE: It's no good.
THE ANNOUNCER: ... or take shelter...
ACE: It won't break!
THE ANNOUNCER: Do not panic.
HEX: Can't you unscrew it or something?
THE ANNOUNCER: Stay calm.
ACE: Give us a knife.
THE ANNOUNCER: This is not a test.
(Knife used.)
ACE: I think I've got it.
(ACE groans with effort.)
THE ANNOUNCER: Air attack...
(Panel removed.)
ACE: Yes!
THE DOCTOR: (radio) Nothing you do can alter or delay the course of events.
HEX: The Doctor?
THE DOCTOR: (radio) The time loop will continue until I return and deactivate it. Until then you must remain here and learn what it is to be human. Find out how it feels to suffer as a human suffers. Find out how it feels to fear as a human fears. Find out what it feels like to die.
(Static.)
HEX: So the Doctor's behind it all. That makes sense.
ACE: What do you mean?
HEX: Well, this is just his style, isn't it? It's not enough to defeat the bad guys, he has to punish them.
ACE: What's wrong with that?
HEX: Well, who died and put him in charge? What right does he have to hand out judgement?
ACE: You make him sound like a monster.
HEX: No, it's just that sometimes he gets so close to the monsters, it's hard to tell them apart.
(Walking over.)
ALBERT: Peggy, we have to go down into the basement now!
PEGGY: All right, no need to raise your voice. What about you two?
ACE: What difference does it make? We know we can't die here.
ALBERT: Just because you've been brought back to life doesn't mean you won't suffer.
PEGGY: You don't want to stay up here, love. I did it once and believe me, being burned alive isn't much fun.
ACE: All right, you've convinced me.
(Door closed.)
ALBERT: Down the steps, quick, and into the refuge.
(Climbing down steps.)
PEGGY: Albert?
ALBERT: It's all right, love. I'm here, beside you.
ACE: Here we go again.
(Nuclear blast. PEGGY gasps.)
ALBERT: Peggy, are you all right?
PEGGY: I don't like it. Make it stop.
ALBERT: Hush, it's all right, dear. I'm with you.
PEGGY: Albert, I'm shaking.
ALBERT: That's just shock, Peggy love. That's all.
ACE: I still can't believe the Doctor's behind all this.
PEGGY: The Doctor? Your friend?
HEX: Yeah. We think he's the one who created the time loop.
ACE: He must have had a good reason to keep you two locked up. So maybe you should start talking.
PEGGY: You think he imprisoned us here?
ALBERT: We didn't even know about the Doctor until you mentioned him.
ACE: Yeah, so you say.
(Moving off.)
HEX: Ace, what are you doing?
ACE: There's no point hanging round down here.
HEX: But you can't go upstairs. The radiation.
ACE: Bring it on, that's what I say. Are you coming or not?
(Moving off.)

(Door opened.)
HEX: Whoah. The blast's burned everything to a crisp.
ACE: Just like before.
(Door closed. Walking round, crunchy underfoot.)
HEX: What are you looking for?
ACE: I just want a chance to think without those two around.
HEX: Albert and Peggy?
ACE: If that's their real names. What do we really know about them? Only what they've told us.
HEX: And that they're human.
ACE: No. You heard the Doctor's message. Whoever this prison is for, he designed it to make them feel what it's like to be human. Maybe the Doctor made them human.
(Whistling from outside.)
HEX: The fall-out warning.
(Radio speeded up voice about a cloud of debris after a nuclear explosion.)
HEX: But - if they weren't human, what are they?
THE ANNOUNCER: ... sickness, and even death.
ACE: I don't know. But there must be some way of finding out.
(Adjusting device.)
HEX: The radio?
ACE: The Doctor made a recording deliberately. Maybe we didn't hear all of it.
HEX: Knife?
ACE: Oh thanks. If I can just ... force it open.
THE DOCTOR: (radio) This is the Earth that resulted from your interference. Well, not the entire planet, just the surrounding five miles or so, all sealed within a pocket dimension.

PEGGY: (radio) Doctor, what have you done?
THE DOCTOR: (radio) What have I done?
PEGGY: You think the Doctor will come for them?
THE DOCTOR: (radio) I've caught you in a trap of your own making. Two future time-lines.
PEGGY: You don't think he might abandon his friends rather than release us?
THE DOCTOR: (radio) All I had to do was make sure that you ended up in the wrong one...
ALBERT: There was always that possibility. It would be interesting to find out.

THE DOCTOR: (radio) Now, if you'll excuse me, I have two friends who'll be beginning to wonder where I've got to.
(Door opened.)
THE DOCTOR: (radio) I'd start work on that fallout shelter if I were you.
(Fades to static.)
HEX: You were right. Elder Gods.
ACE: The Doctor mentioned his two friends. He must have done all this while we were sleeping. But why make a recording?
HEX: More to the point, where is he now? Why hasn't he turned up like he promised?
ACE: Maybe "Albert" and "Peggy" haven't been here for long enough.
HEX: Ace, they've been here for a hundred years. Do you think the Doctor would inflict that even on his worst enemies?
ACE: No, you're right. Something must have happened to him.
(Radio suddenly reverse sound.)
ACE: Time's going backwards. But it shouldn't be happening yet, should it?
PEGGY: Yes, my dear. You see, while we might not be able to escape the time loop, we have learned how to control it.
ALBERT: Backwards and forwards. Forwards and backwards.
PEGGY: Round and round we go.
(PEGGY then ALBERT laugh.)
HEX: What do you want? Why have you brought us here?
PEGGY: Haven't you worked it out? We weren't trying to bring you here.
ALBERT: We were trying to bring the Doctor here.
ACE: Bet you were disappointed when we walked out of the TARDIS instead.
PEGGY: As disappointed as you were when a few short moments later the TARDIS departed without you.
ALBERT: The Doctor choosing to abandon his companions? Just as he abandoned us a hundred years ago.
(Radio announcer starts again and alert sound.)
ACE: The Doctor wouldn't leave us here to die. He wouldn't!
PEGGY: Then why not put it to the test? Call him.
HEX: What do you mean, call him?
ALBERT: He must have given you some means of summoning the TARDIS.
HEX: Don't you think if we had, we would have done it already?
PEGGY: Sounds to me like he wanted to be rid of you.
ACE: If the Doctor knew we were here, he'd come and find us. I know he would.
PEGGY: Then call him.
ACE: We can't! We don't have any way of contacting him.
ALBERT: You do. The radio.
HEX: The radio?
ALBERT: You can use it to send him a message.
ACE: No! If that's what you want us to do, we won't help you.
PEGGY: We thought you might say that.
(Radio voice going backwards.)
ALBERT: Stop.
(The radio voice stops.)
ALBERT: We have it in our power to make you experience the instant of destruction a hundred times over.
PEGGY: A thousand times over.
ALBERT: The agony of being burned alive by the scorching heat of a nuclear explosion over and over again.
PEGGY: We will make you suffer just as the Doctor made us suffer.
HEX: Ace, we don't have any choice.
ACE: (sigh.) All right. I'll do it.
(Adjusting radio.)
ACE: Doctor? This is Ace and Hex. We're trapped inside this pocket dimension thing, with a couple of former Elder Gods. Please, wherever you are, come and get us out of here!
ALBERT: Oh dear. It seems he doesn't want to answer.
PEGGY: I can't hear the sound of his TARDIS, can you?
ALBERT: No. Then wherever the Doctor is, either he doesn't know you're here, or he doesn't care.
ACE: If the Doctor heard that message, he would be on his way!
HEX: Unless you were right, and something's happened to him.
PEGGY: Either way, he's not coming to save you.
ALBERT: And there's no-one else who can.
(Static then radio again.)
THE ANNOUNCER: If an attack with nuclear weapons is expected, you will hear the following sound.
(The voice changes.)
THE ANNOUNCER: You will hear the following sound...
(Static of interference.)
THE ANNOUNCER: ... damage from the...
(New deep voice of alien, MOLOCH. The voice is similar to Mestor from the Colin Baker story "The Twin Dilemma")
MOLOCH: "In that feud, he rejoiced not."
HEX: What the hell?
MOLOCH: "But afar him be banish'd, the Maker ..."
ACE: It's reciting poetry.
[Ace showing her surprising familiarity with the English translation of The Tale of Beowulf, Sometime King Of The Folk Of The Weder Geats.]
MOLOCH: "From mankind for the crime he had wrought ..."
PEGGY: He's coming.
ALBERT: He has answered our call at last.
HEX: Who has?
MOLOCH: "But offspring uncouth ..."
PEGGY: It is the voice of our salvation.
[MOLOCH, clearly less familiar with The Tale of Beowulf than Ace, misses out "thence were they awoken Eotens and elf-wights, and ogres of ocean" and moves on to the next line:]
MOLOCH: "And therewith the Giants ..."
ACE: Who? Who are you talking about?
MOLOCH: "... who won war against God a long while ..."
ALBERT: It is the one we serve. It is Moloch.
MOLOCH: "But he gave them their wages therefor."
ACE: Moloch?
MOLOCH: I have come, my children. I have come to set you free.

(Closing Doctor Who theme music composed by Keff McCulloch, with no announcer.)

PART FOUR

(Opening Doctor Who theme music composed by Keff McCulloch, with no announcer.)
PEGGY: He's coming.
ALBERT: He has answered our call at last.
HEX: Who has?
(MOLOCH is quoting from an old English translation of The Tale of Beowulf)
MOLOCH: "But offspring uncouth ..."
PEGGY: It is the voice of our salvation.
(MOLOCH, missing out a line of the verse, continues)
MOLOCH: "And therewith the Giants ..."
ACE: Who? Who are you talking about?
MOLOCH: "... who won war against God a long while ..."
ALBERT: It is the one we serve. It is Moloch.
MOLOCH: "But he gave them their wages therefor."
ACE: Moloch?
MOLOCH: I have come, my children. I have come to set you free.
HEX: Moloch? Who's he when he's at home?
ACE: Another Elder God.
ALBERT: The first and the greatest.
ACE: Oh, right - your boss.
PEGGY: It is he who gave us life.
ALBERT: And instructed us to devastate the Earth.
HEX: Right ... And he's on his way? Is he travelling far?
PEGGY: He resides in the fires at the dawn of Time, but soon he shall be here and we shall be released.
ACE: This Moloch bloke - he's homing in on the radio signal?
ALBERT: As to a beacon in the darkness.
ACE: Well, we'll see about that!
(Grunts as she attacks the radio. Static from the radio.)
PEGGY: Stop that!
ACE: Or what? You'll kill me?
ALBERT: Oh, we can do more than just kill you.
PEGGY: You destroy that and you will be imprisoned here with us.
ACE: Well, the way I look at it...
(Siren starts.)
ACE: ... that's got to be better than the alternative.
ALBERT: You would rather be trapped here, than allow us to go free?
ACE: If that's what it takes. Isn't that right, Hex?
HEX: Yeah. Er, yeah. What Ace said.
ALBERT: Then so be it. Let there be light.
(Sudden whine. ACE and HEX gasp.)
ACE: The bomb!
PEGGY: Remember not to look or you'll go blind.
(She laughs.)
HEX: You won't let any of this happen?
ALBERT: Of course. And now you have about twenty seconds to get down into the fallout shelter before the heat blast hits.
ACE: Twenty seconds? I can finish destroying this thing in half that time.
(ACE grunts as she attacks the radio.)
ACE: There. Now we're all stuck here. Forever!
PEGGY: You're too late, my dear. He's here. He's here.
HEX: Ace, we've got to go.
ACE: No!
HEX: We've got to go!
(Door opened. Rush of blast, which stops prematurely.)
PEGGY: The moment of death.
ALBERT: The raging fires of a nuclear holocaust, frozen in time. The trees twisting in the unmoving wind, the shattered glass of the windows hanging in mid-air.
PEGGY: It is beautiful. A vision to be savoured.
ALBERT: A vision of the future destruction of this world.
MOLOCH: I have come.
PEGGY: My Lord, where are you? We cannot see you.
MOLOCH: I stand on the threshold of this dimension. The integrity of this realm is weak. The forces preserving it have decayed over the centuries.
PEGGY: We know. That is how we have gained control over it using the power of our will.
MOLOCH: Were it not for this decay, I would not have been able to find you. The veil that concealed you from my gaze has finally now been lifted.
PEGGY: You have been searching for us, all this time?
MOLOCH: When you did not return to me as you had been bid, I knew that some ill must have befallen you.
PEGGY: But now you have come to release us.
MOLOCH: You do not understand, my children. I cannot release you while it is your force of will that sustains this realm.
ALBERT: What do you mean?
MOLOCH: This dimensional prison requires the presence of prisoners to uphold its existence.
PEGGY: You mean, if we attempt to leave, it will all disappear?
MOLOCH: And I would not be able to pluck you free.
ALBERT: But there must be something we can do.
PEGGY: There is. We just have to find someone to take our place.

(Sheet draped onto the ground. ACE groans.)
ACE: Hex! What did you do that for?
HEX: Hey. No need to thank me for saving your life.
ACE: Don't you get it? If we get killed, time rewinds itself to a point where we were alive.
HEX: Look, I just didn't want to be burnt alive, all right? While we're still walking around and breathin', we've still got a chance of stopping them.
ACE: How?
HEX: I don't know. I was hoping you might have some idea.
ACE: Come on. We're not going to get anywhere hanging around down here.
(Climbing up steps, heaving to lift something, walking out.)
HEX: Where are they? Do you think they've gone already?
ACE: And not gloat first? That's what these Elder Gods live for, the chance to show off how clever they are in front of lesser races.
HEX: Like the Doctor.
ACE: What is your problem, Hex?
HEX: My problem with the Doctor? Apart from what happened to me Mam, being lied to and being treated like some kind of fall guy.
ACE: You could always ask him to take you home.
HEX: And where would that be, exactly? It's ... it's not that I want to go, it's ... it's just ... well, the Doctor. Don't you think that he's different from how he used to be?
ACE: Different, how?
HEX: Keeping more secrets. I mean, he only ever used to tell us half of what's going on. But now he doesn't even do that.
ACE: You get used to it.
(Moving broken pieces aside.)
ACE: Hmm. Radio's still broken.
HEX: And he's getting more extreme. It's like ... it's like there's something going on, something bad he won't tell us about, and he's starting to get desperate.
ACE: The Doctor will have a plan. He always has a plan. Whenever I've been in trouble, he's always come through for me.
HEX: Until now.
ACE: No. There's only one reason why he wouldn't be here to help, and that's if he was in trouble too. So now it's time for us to come through for him.
(Whine and faint explosions in the background.)
HEX: The fallout warning.
ACE: Yes. Come on. Let's get some fresh air.
(Whistling of bombs dropping in the distance, nearer.)
ALBERT: Hex and Ace. So glad you could join us.
ACE: See what I mean, Hex? Gloating time.
PEGGY: For a moment we were afraid we wouldn't be able to take our leave of you.
ALBERT: You see, we cannot depart unless someone else assumes our burden.
PEGGY: And who better than yourselves.
ACE: You need us to take your place?
PEGGY: It is a pleasing irony, that a prison of the Doctor's making should incarcerate his own companions.
ACE: You won't get away with this.
HEX: The Doctor will find us, even if we have to wait a hundred years.
PEGGY: Unfortunately, you will not have that opportunity.
ACE: What do you mean?
ALBERT: The forces that sustain this realm have grown weak. In our absence, it will not exist for more than a few hours.
PEGGY: And then it, and everything inside it, will collapse into a singularity.
ACE: You sure you don't want to stick around for that?
ALBERT: No. We have other places to be. Other times.
PEGGY: Goodbye, and thank you to you both. If it were not for you, we'd still be trapped here.
ALBERT: My Lord Moloch, it is time.
MOLOCH: Then let us begin.
ACE: No. You can't force us to do this.
MOLOCH: There is no need. You will acquiesce willingly.
HEX: Er, no, I don't think so.
MOLOCH: You - the girl who calls herself Ace - you will submit, or I will kill the boy Hex.
ACE: Go ahead.
MOLOCH: And you - the boy who calls himself Hex - you will submit, or I will kill the girl Ace.
HEX: Won't work. We'd both rather die than submit to you.
MOLOCH: You may say that, but I can see the truth in your mind - neither of you are prepared to see the other die.
ACE: Yeah? Try us.
MOLOCH: Very well, my children. Kill the girl called Ace.
ALBERT: As you command, my Lord.
(Taking hold of a shovel.)
ACE: Guess you're not thinking of digging over your spuds with that.
HEX: All, right, all right, stop! Please!
MOLOCH: Then you have a simple choice. Submit, or she will die.
HEX: Then ... Ace - I'm sorry...
(His voice at the end slowed down, and the sound of him fading.)
ACE: What have you done? What have you done with him?
MOLOCH: He is now part of this realm. Now you have a choice. You may either remain here with him, or you can leave.
ACE: Thanks but no thanks. I don't abandon my friends.
MOLOCH: You would rather be imprisoned with him than enjoy your freedom?
ACE: Yes.
MOLOCH: Then so be it!
(MOLOCH laughs.)

(Background sound of digging and Carmen - Bizet. HEX humming along to it.)
ACE: Albert? Cup of tea.
HEX: Thanks, love.
(As they continue in an imitation of a Yorkshire accent to recite the lines originally said by ALBERT and PEGGY)
PEGGY: It's a pity they will only be here for a few hours. I would like for them to suffer as we've suffered.
ALBERT: As would I. But our penance here is done.
MOLOCH: Then come, my children. Let us leave the Doctor's companions to their torment.
PEGGY: After a hundred years.
ALBERT: After ten thousand deaths.
PEGGY: We are free.
ALBERT:/PEGGY: Free at last!
(MOLOCH laughs. The sound of them disappearing, then siren sounds.)
THE ANNOUNCER: Air attack warning. Go to your fallout room or take shelter. Do not panic. Stay calm. This is not a test.
ACE: Oh my lord. So this is it, Albert.
HEX: Think so, dear. Come on. We'd better get into the inner refuge.
THE ANNOUNCER: Stay calm. This is not a test.
ACE: All right. No need to raise your voice. I'm going.
(Sudden whine.)
ACE: Oh my goodness. The light!
HEX: Cover your eyes, dear. Keep your eyes shut.
(Door opened.)
HEX: That's it, dear. In you go. Try and make yourself comfortable.
(Walking in.)
ACE: Albert!
HEX: It's all right, love. I'm here beside you.
(Blast, crashing.)
ACE: Oh, no!
(Sobbing.)
HEX: Peggy? Are you all right?
ACE: I don't like it.
HEX: Hush. It's all right, dear. I'm with you.
ACE: Albert, I'm shaking.
HEX: That's just the shock, Peggy. That's all.
ACE: Make it...
(They resume their normal accent.)
ACE: Peggy? My name's not ... My name's Ace. Hex ... Hex, what's happening to us?
HEX: This place. It's making us act like Albert and Peggy did. It's trying to make us become them.
ACE: We have to fight it. That's what the Doctor would do. We have to remember who we are.
THE ANNOUNCER: After a nuclear explosion there will be a cloud of deadly dust, called fallout.
(As the radio continues with this line they talk over it as they walk over to it.)
THE ANNOUNCER: It can be carried by winds for hundreds of miles before falling to the ground.
HEX: The radio. It's still working, even though you smashed it to pieces.
ACE: Yeah.
THE ANNOUNCER: The radiation from this dust...
ACE: Doctor, if you can hear me, Hex and me are stuck in this pocket dimension of yours, and the people you put in it have escaped. Please come and help us. Doctor?
(Static, then THE DOCTOR appears on the radio.)
THE DOCTOR: (radio) ... for hundreds of miles before falling to the ground.
(As his voice continues)
HEX: It's the Doctor.
ACE: He was the one who set up this whole place. He must have programmed this thing somehow.
HEX: Programmed?
ACE: Don't you see? The voice on the radio controls everything that happens here. It gives a warning about fallout, and ... and the fallout starts.
(Bombs heard dropping in the background outside.)
HEX: I get that, yeah, but ... how does it help us?
ACE: Look, if the voice on the radio wants us to stay downstairs, maybe that's because...
HEX: There's something out here it doesn't want us to find.
ACE: Exactly. So whatever it tells us to do, we do the opposite.
THE DOCTOR: (radio) The first two days will be the most dangerous. Remain within your inner refuge, no matter how uncomfortable it may be.
HEX: What about the radiation?
THE DOCTOR: (radio) If you have to leave your inner refuge for water, food or sanitation...
ACE: We'll just have to grin and bear it, won't we?

(Sound of outside howling wind as the radio voice continues.)
THE DOCTOR: (radio) ... make sure your time outside is as brief as possible. Do not leave your fallout room under any circumstances.
(Outside, walking quickly.)
HEX: Where are we going?
ACE: The Doctor said this dimension consists of the five miles surrounding the house.
HEX: We're looking for the edge?
ACE: Got it in one.
HEX: Five miles in this? We'll freeze to death.
ACE: Not if we keep moving.
HEX: Should it be dark already? The mushroom cloud. It's filled up the whole sky. We should get under cover.
ACE: No time. We have to keep moving.
HEX: This isn't just rain. If we stay out here...
ACE: We keep moving!
(Thunder. Rain falling. HEX and ACE coughing.)
HEX: It's no good. My legs ... seizing up ... cramps.
ACE: You can talk. I feel like I'm ... burning up.
HEX: I'm not gonna make it.
ACE: We have to try.
HEX: I can barely move. We're both suffering from acute radiation poisoning. We'll be dead within minutes.
ACE: Maybe ... maybe that's it. Maybe that's the way out.
HEX: What?
ACE: If we're supposed to die ... hiding in the basement...
(She coughs.)
ACE: ... like Albert and Peggy did, then maybe, if it happens out here...

(Sudden transformation to inside.)
HEX: What happened?
ACE: We're back in the basement. This place wants us to die here.
(They revert to the Yorkshire accent.)
HEX: What day is it? How long have we been down here?
ACE: Hold on. I'll shine the torch to check. Seven days.
HEX: Only another seven to go then, love.
ACE: I don't think I can bear it any more, Albert, being cooped up here in the dark.
HEX: We just have to sit it out. Remember what the leaflet said. We're just to stay in the fallout room until the all-clear.
(The radio is heard from a nearby room.)
THE DOCTOR: (radio) If the all-clear has not been sounded, and anyone dies while you were in the fallout room, move the body to another room in the house.
(ACE coughs.)
ACE: You'll look after me, won't you, Albert?
THE DOCTOR: (radio) Wrap the body in polythene, paper or blankets, and label it with name and address...
HEX: Of course I will, love. That's what I'm here for.
(As radio voice continues)
THE DOCTOR: (radio) However, if the body has been in the house for more than five days, you should bury the body outside.
ACE: Only I'm so tired. I must be coming down with something.
HEX: That's just the stress, love. Wears you out.
ACE: And I was sick in the night, twice.
HEX: We'll be all right, love. You just wait and see. They'll sound the all-clear, and we'll be able to go outside, and the Government will have got everything sorted out. They'll look after us, and everything will go back to how it was before.
ACE: What about Raymond?
HEX: He'll be fine, love. He's got a good head on his shoulders. He'll have found somewhere safe, and when it's safe to come out, he'll be on his way home to see his Mum and Dad.
ACE: I think I can hear him now. I think I can hear his car.
HEX: Yes. That's right, love. You just have a little nap before he arrives.
ACE: You really think everything will be all right?
HEX: Of course it will. You mark my words. Now, you get some sleep.
ACE: Goodnight.
HEX: Goodnight, love.
(ACE sighing.)
HEX: See you in the morning.

(All-clear signal.)
THE DOCTOR: (radio) When there is no immediate danger of air attack or fallout, an all-clear warning will sound, and you may resume normal activities.
(Everything reverses, voices reverse, scenes move back rapidly, then we are back with HEX humming Carmen's Bizet.)
ACE: Albert? Cup of tea.
(Cup passed.)
HEX: Thanks, love.
(Drinking, sigh, cup put on saucer.)
HEX: Hits the spot.
ACE: How's me brave soldier? You've dug...
(They resume their normal accents.)
ACE: We've gone back to the start!
HEX: The time loop. Whatever we do, we go back to square one.
ACE: Let's see about that.
(Soaring sound overhead.)
HEX: Where are you going now?
(Door opened.)
HEX: We're stealing Albert's car?
ACE: If we can't walk out of here, we can drive.
HEX: Good old Toby Jug.
(Toby jug is where the car keys were hidden.)
ACE: Get in.
(Doors of car closed.)
HEX: Ready?
ACE: You bet.
THE DOCTOR: (radio) If an attack with nuclear weapons is expected, you will hear the following sound.
(As the rest of the announcement sounds)
HEX: Which way are we going?
ACE: Does it matter? The bomb'll hit over there somewhere, so let's try the opposite direction.
HEX: How long do we have?
ACE: When we first arrived, we had about half an hour before the bomb hit.
HEX: So we've got half an hour to get out of this place?
ACE: Shouldn't be a problem, particularly as there's no other traffic.
(Fizzing from car radio.)
THE DOCTOR: (radio) Air attack warning.
HEX: I thought you said we had half an hour?
ACE: This place is accelerating time in order to stop us from getting away.
HEX: So what are we gonna do? We can't get back to the house.
ACE: We'll have to run for it.
THE DOCTOR: (radio) Air attack warning. Go to your fallout room...
HEX: We need to get under cover. Those trees.
ACE: They're not going to be much use against an atom bomb.
THE DOCTOR: (radio) Do not panic. Stay calm.
(Car stops. Getting out of car.)
THE DOCTOR: (radio) Air attack warning...
HEX: Okay. We have to lie down flat on the ground and cover...
ACE: The light! I can feel it, burning my hair. Aah, my skin!
HEX: Flat on the ground! Face-down!

(Back to the Yorkshire accent, back in the inner refuge.)
HEX: What day is it? How long have we been down here?
ACE: Hold on. I'll shine the torch to check. Seven days.
HEX: Only another seven to go then, love.
ACE: I don't think I can...
(They gasp and recover and resume their own accents.)
ACE: It was quicker this time.
HEX: What do you mean?
ACE: When we first went through this it took us seven days to reach this point. Now it only feels like a few minutes.
HEX: Time is speeding up?
ACE: The time loop must be contracting, each time around, giving us less and less time before we go back to the start - until we have no time left at all.
(Radio sounding from another room.)
THE DOCTOR: (radio) If the all-clear has not been sounded, and anyone dies while you were in the fallout room...
ACE: There's something about this place that doesn't make sense.
THE DOCTOR: (radio) ... move the body to another room in the house.
HEX: Just the one thing?
ACE: The TARDIS. We still don't know how Albert and Peggy managed to bring it here.
HEX: Well ... maybe they had special powers.
ACE: No. The Doctor wouldn't leave them with the ability to drag the TARDIS off course.
HEX: Then how do you think they did it?
ACE: What were they doing when we first arrived?
HEX: They were just behaving as normal.
ACE: Of course! That must be it! Hex, the Doctor set up this place to teach them what it is to be human, right?
HEX: Yeah, so?
ACE: So how would he know when they'd learned their lesson?
HEX: I don't know.
ACE: He'd know because they'd be acting as though they were human.
HEX: You mean ... whoever's in this prison goes around and around until they do all the same things that the real Albert and Peggy did?
ACE: We've been getting it the wrong way round!
HEX: Ah.
ACE: We've been trying to resist the pattern when we should have been trying to follow it.
HEX: I get it. Like Groundhog Day. It keeps repeatin' until Bill Murray gets it right, and then...
ACE: It brings the TARDIS here.
HEX: That's why the Doctor didn't tell them how long they'd be imprisoned here. He didn't know how long it'd take.
ACE: So if we go along with the pattern, if we follow it exactly, this place will summon the TARDIS.
HEX: But Albert and Peggy were stuck here for a hundred years. They had a whole century to get it right. We've only got a few hours.
ACE: Yeah. But we have a head start.
HEX: We do?
ACE: We do. Because we already know what it's like to be human.
THE DOCTOR: (radio) When there is no immediate danger of air attack or fallout, an all-clear warning will sound, and you may resume normal activities.
(Reversing speech and scenes.)

(Carmen's Bizet playing, digging.)
ACE: Albert? Cup of tea.
HEX: Thanks, love.
(Drinking, sighing, cup put on saucer.)
HEX: Hits the spot.
ACE: How's me brave soldier? You've dug quite a trench there.
THE ANNOUNCER: Air attack warning. Go to your fallout room...
(Siren sounds.)
ACE: Oh my Lord. So this is it, Albert.
HEX: Think so, dear. Come on. We'd better get into the inner refuge.
(Door opened, going inside.)
HEX: That's it, dear. In you go. Try and make yourself comfortable. Remember, keep your hands over your ears.
ACE: Albert?
HEX: It's all right, love. I'm here beside you.
(Sound changes to another scene. ACE gasps)
ACE: I think I can hear him now. I think I can hear his car.
HEX: Yes. That's right, love. You just have a little nap before he arrives.
ACE: You really think everything will be all right?
HEX: Of course it will. You mark my words. Now, you get some sleep.
ACE: (sighs.) Goodnight.
(She sighs again.)
HEX: Goodnight, love. See you in the morning.
(Scene changes again, reversing speech and scenes, then back to the Carmen Bizet song and digging and Yorkshire accent)
ACE: Albert? Cup of tea.
HEX: Thanks, love.
(Drinking ... then going back to normal accents.)
HEX: Albert? We did everything we were supposed to do. It hasn't worked. It hasn't worked!
ACE: We have to keep trying.
HEX: Don't you see? You were wrong.
(Getting more upset)
HEX: There's no way out. We're gonna die...!
(Radio fizzes.)
THE DOCTOR: (radio) Well done. It seems you have learned how to act like human beings.
HEX: Ace? It's the Doctor. He's here.
ACE: No, it's a hologram, a recording.
THE DOCTOR: (radio) And before I summon the TARDIS, I have some bad news for you. You see, I'm afraid that it will be impossible for either of you to be released unless one of you remains here. This prison requires the presence of a prisoner to sustain it.
HEX: We know. That's how we ended up stuck 'ere.
THE DOCTOR: (radio) So all you have to do is decide which of you can have your freedom, and which of you will be consigned to this reality for the rest of eternity. You have one minute to decide.
HEX: One minute? Thanks.
ACE: Well, it's not difficult, is it?
HEX: No?
ACE: I'm going to stay, you can go.
HEX: Er, no. I think not. Look, you're better at this saving planets lark than me. You'll do more good, and you were with the Doctor long before I came along. I'll stay.
ACE: No, you don't get to decide. You're a nurse. Your job is saving lives. Me, I just blow things up. I'm staying, and that's final.
HEX: No. No-one gets to lay their life down for me, not even you, Ace.
HEX: Don't be stupid. Do you want to be stuck here forever? Oh! I'm trying to do the right thing here.
HEX: And so am I. Besides, if I was the one set free, I'd never forgive meself. I think I'll be okay here on me own knowing it was for a good cause.
ACE: A good cause? Oh! You patronising little...!
THE DOCTOR: (radio) Time's up! I hope you've sorted out what you want to do. I'll be asking each of you individually what you've decided.
(Sudden sound of teleportation.)
HEX: Hey. Where did Ace go? What have you done with Ace?
THE DOCTOR: (radio) You must tell me your decision. Which is it to be? Will you be the one who stays, or the one who leaves?
HEX: I'm staying.
THE DOCTOR: (radio) As you wish.
(Sudden sound of teleportation.)
ACE: Hey! What did you do? Where's Hex?
THE DOCTOR: (radio) You must tell me your decision. Which is it to be? Will you be the one who stays, or the one who leaves?
ACE: What do you think? I'm staying.
THE DOCTOR: (radio) As you wish.
(Sudden sound of teleportation.)
HEX: Whoah! Ace, you're back.
ACE: Er - if either of us has been doing a disappearing act, it's you.
HEX: So you told the Doctor what you wanted to do?
ACE: I did. And you?
HEX: Yeah. I told him I wanted to stay.
ACE: You Muppet. I told him I wanted to stay.
HEX: What? But ... what happens if we both say we want...?
THE DOCTOR: (radio) Congratulations. You've passed my final test.
ACE: Your final test?
THE DOCTOR: (radio) I had to be sure you had learned your lesson, and so I set you a little Prisoner's Dilemma, because only a true human would be prepared to sacrifice their life in order to save another.
HEX: Oh, I get it. Very clever.
THE DOCTOR: (radio) And so I gave you a choice. Protect or survive. And both of you chose to protect, and so you both get to survive. And now with any luck, my TARDIS should be on its way.
(Radio fades. TARDIS materialisation.)
ACE: Listen.
HEX: The TARDIS. It worked! Ace, it worked!
(Materialisation stops.)
ACE: Hang about. It's black. Something's turned it black.
HEX: Who cares what colour it is? It's here, isn't it?

(TARDIS doors operated, inside the control room.)
HEX: Okay. We've got to get out of here before this dimension collapses.
ACE: Er, Hex...
HEX: First, close the doors, then I think I can remember the right sequence of switches on the console. This switch first.
ACE: Hex.
HEX: What?
ACE: We're not alone in here. Look.
HEX: Oh, my...
(Gun prepared for firing.)
LYSANDRA ARISTEDES: Don't move, either of you.
(Another gun prepared to fire.)
HEX: I don't believe it.
ACE: What are you doing here?
SALLY MORGAN: Nice to see you too, Miss McShane. I might ask the same question.
ACE: Yeah? And who's your friend with the gun?
LYSANDRA ARISTEDES: Captain? You know these people?
SALLY MORGAN: Just keep them covered, Private.
ACE: I'll ask again, shall I? What are you doing here?
HEX: More to the point, what have you done with the Doctor?

(Closing Doctor Who theme music composed by Keff McCulloch.)

ANNOUNCER: Doctor Who - Protect And Survive starred Sylvester McCoy as The Doctor, Sophie Aldred as Ace, Philip Olivier as Hex, Ian Hogg as Albert, Elizabeth Bennett as Peggy, and Peter Egan as Moloch and The Announcer. It was written by Jonathan Morris, Directed by Ken Bentley and was a Big Finish Production.
[Note: also featured Maggie O'Neill as Lysandra Aristedes, and Amy Pemberton as Sally Morgan. What happens next is in the Big Finish story Black And White.]